Air Combat Simulation – Part 4

E is for Energy

Welcome to another edition of our series on air combat simulation. Today we’re going to discuss the important issue of energy management. But before we do that, let’s first take a look at the most decisive phase of a dogfight – the opening few moments.

A dogfight should begin with an analytical assessment to help you build a three-dimensional picture of the situation before engaging the opposing aircraft.
A dogfight should begin with an analytical assessment to help you build a three-dimensional picture of the situation before engaging the opposing aircraft. Derek Davis

Any encounter should begin with a clinical analysis of the prevailing situation - the ultimate aim of which is to gain a tactical advantage over your opponent. The initial impulse, particularly of a newcomer, is to turn immediately into the opposing aircraft in an effort to get on to the opponent’s tail as quickly as possible. However, although this is obviously your ultimate objective, you should try to resist this impulse, unless, of course, you are in immediate danger of being shot down.

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