Beijing’s Broken Birds

ROGER SOUPART TAKES A STROLL THROUGH THE CHINA S AVIATION MUSEUM’S ‘BONEYARD’

RELICS

CHINA

img_36-1_7.jpg
One of the Chinese collection’s visually striking Il-10s. As can be seen, this example remains on its undercarriage.

Aircraft dumps, especially those of World War Two, with hundreds or thousands of hulks awaiting scrapping have always held special interest for enthusiasts. Lines of broken birds, be it at Kingman, Arizona, or Biak in what was then the Dutch East Indies, or Guam in the Western Pacific, or any other desolate airfield are the stuff of dreams.

Become a Premium Member to Read More

This is a premium article and requires an active Key.Aero subscription to view.

I’m an existing member, sign me in!

I don’t have a subscription…

Enjoy the following subscriber only benefits:

  • Unlimited access to all KeyAero content
  • Exclusive in-depth articles and analysis, videos, quizzes added daily
  • A fully searchable archive – boasting hundreds of thousands of pieces of quality aviation content
  • Access to read all our leading aviation magazines online - meaning you can enjoy the likes of FlyPast, Aeroplane Monthly, AirForces Monthly, Combat Aircraft, Aviation News, Airports of the World, PC Pilot and Airliner World - as soon as they leave the editor’s desk.
  • Access on any device- anywhere, anytime
  • Choose from our offers below