Boeing 757: Seattle’s Dark Horse

With high performance and good economics, Boeing’s long-ranged 757 found a niche in the market, particularly with US carriers on domestic operations and for European charter operations. Many 757s have found new life as freighters, as Barry Lloyd describes.

With 23 757-200s and two 757-300s in the fleet, Icelandair is one of the largest non-US 757 operators. In 2017, 757-200, TF-FIR Vatnajökull, was painted to highlight the largest glacier in Europe.
AirTeamImages.com/Simon Willson

The success of the 727 was no doubt very satisfactory for Boeing’s management in Seattle with more than 1,800 being built, and in the mid-1970s, an era of high demand for new aircraft, the manufacturer studied a stretched and modified version, to be known as the 727-300.

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