BRIEFING FILE

Under the skin of aviation technology and tactics

The contribution made to the advancement of aircraft performance by the Schneider Trophy racers was considerable, but how did this manifest itself?

THE SCHNEIDER EFFECT

The winner of the 1913 race in Monaco, Maurice Prévost’s 160hp Gnôme rotary-powered and float-equipped Deperdussin.
VIA JAMES KIGHTLY

Jacques Schneider — industrialist, pioneer French aeroplane pilot, powerboat racer and record-setting balloonist — thought marine aircraft development should be stimulated by a competition. In December 1912 he offered a massive sculpture, the Schneider Trophy — properly the Coupe d’Aviation Maritime Jacques Schneider — valued at 25,000 Francs as a prize.

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