The de Havilland Tiger Moth

De Havilland started the 1930s with a reliable training aircraft that would have military use right until the end of the ’50s

Once Britain entered the 1930s and de Havilland entered its second decade, Geoffrey de Havilland unleashed a new biplane to replace the likes of the Humming Bird. This, as Alistair Hodgson from the de Havilland Museum (www.dehavillandmuseum.co.uk) explains in this video, was the result: the famous Tiger Moth.

Incredibly successful and utilised by the RAF largely as a trainer, the Tiger Moth was introduced in early 1932 and was only retired from military use in 1959. During World War II it was used by the RAF for surveillance, and some were even used to train pilots for bombing practice – as this exclusive video shows…