DEVELOPMENT

Just two examples of Avro’s 652 small airliner were built, but the design gave rise to the company’s most numerous type

Avro 652 G-ACRN Avatar, one of the two examples of this prewar civil transport delivered to Imperial Airways.
AEROPLANE

The origins of the Anson can be found in a charter design developed in 1933 for Imperial Airways. It was a four-passenger type, with two crew plus a mail and baggage compartment, designated as the Avro 652. The concept resulted from a meeting between the newly knighted Sir John Siddeley and the managing director of Imperial Airways, G. E. Woods Humphrey, who realised an advanced monoplane was required to compete with overseas offerings. In May, the idea was transformed into a paper design study by Avro designer Roy Chadwick (A. V.

Roe and Co being owned at the time by Armstrong Siddeley Holdings) for a machine with 150mph cruise performance over 600 miles.

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