Every man was keen for the momentous day

ARMY CO-OP MUSTANGS

When the new North American Mustang, in its early Allison-engined variants, was chosen to supply the RAF’s army co-operation squadrons in January 1942, it created a combination that proved pivotal when the day finally came to send Allied forces back to France. In the lead-up to D-Day, RAF army co-operation Mustangs would provide vital photographic reconnaissance of the Normandy coast, and as operations began, highly specialised artillery spotting and tactical reconnaissance flights

An Odiham-based Mustang I of No 39 Wing — made up of Nos 168, 414 and 430 Squadrons — pictured in July 1944. Army Cooperation Command Mustangs only wore invasion stripes for a short while.
RAF ODIHAM

It was a small, but hardened, group of RAF, Royal Canadian Air Force and US Army Air Forces Mustang squadrons that geared up for the long-awaited invasion of ‘Fortress Europe’. In the event, their handful of ageing aircraft provided much of the information that Allied commanders needed to secure the beach-head and push inland.

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