Insights

Pleasant to fly, the Oxford’s more demanding characteristics rendered it a good trainer

An RAF Oxford about to go night flying.
AEROPLANE

Originally developed because the Air Ministry believed the docile Avro Anson was too challenging to use as a trainer, the Oxford proved to be the more demanding machine of the two, and arguably resulted in the production of better pilots. Most accounts cite the Oxford as a pleasant aircraft to fly, and note that it encouraged precision, particularly on take-off, approach and landing. Another almost universal impression was that Oxfords could become prone to heavy pre-stall buffeting, and unpredictable in wing drop.

In 1938, a Flight reporter noted: “The controls appear to be everything that they should be, and the aileron control in particular is a good deal more pungent than is usually expected in comparatively large aeroplanes; their effect is equally vigorous at comparatively low gliding speeds, and does not seem to differ one way or the other when the flaps are in the fully down position.”

Want to read more?

This is a premium article and requires an active Key.Aero or Key Publishing subscription.

Existing subscriber? Sign in now

No subscription?

Pick one of our introductory offers

3 months

Standard subscription rate £29.99 + VAT

Launch rate £15.99 + VAT

Subscribe now
Reccomended

12 months

Standard subscription rate £69.99 + VAT

Launch rate £29.99 + VAT

Subscribe now

9 months

Standard subscription rate £39.99 + VAT

Launch rate £19.99 + VAT

Subscribe now