ITAR Preserving America’s edge

Intel Report

A succession of treaties, including ITAR, have attempted to restrict the export of US-built military hardware. But as Alan Warnes explains, there are many other options, and these can have a significant effect on the US military aerospace business.

A Chinese-made J-10B powered by a thrust-vectoring version of the indigenous WS-10 engine is put through its paces at last year’s China International Aviation & Aerospace Exhibition at Zhuhai. Although the J-10 should be an attractive proposition for foreign customers seeking to avoid reliance on Western manufacturers, it has yet to win any export orders. Katsuhiko Tokunaga

In some countries, ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) is almost akin to a dirty word. In the Middle East and Asia in particular, aerospace companies are making efforts to avoid working with ITAR-regulated systems. One industry source told AFM: “It causes delays to sales and procurement.” He added: “But if you don’t abide by the rules it can lead to big fines, imprisonment and blacklisting, so you will never work in the industry again.”

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