IN THE LINE OF FIRE

DARREN HARBAR OUTLINES THE DE HAVILLAND QUEEN BEE DRONE AND ITS THREE SURVIVORS

EARLY DRONES DE HAVILLAND QUEEN BEE

De Havilland Queen Bee LF858 is maintained in flying condition at Henlow, Bedfordshire. ALL IMAGES AUTHOR UNLESS NOTED
Queen Bee K5107 of 3 Anti-Aircraft Co-operation Unit, based at RAF Kalafrana, Malta. Built in 1935, this machine crashed off the island on October 5, 1937. KEY

In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the USA, the word ‘drone’ has taken on a new meaning. It now conjures up visions of remotely-piloted high-tech aircraft carrying out relentless surveillance, or unleashing precision-guided weapons.

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