PC Pilot Issue 121 Downloads

Specially selected freeware and videos of flight sims reviewed in the May-June 2019 issue.

Flysimware’s Falcon 50

This video takes a close look at the internal and external detailing of Flysimware’s Falcon 50 (review starts on page 12). You are also given a tour of the high-quality cockpit and instrumentation – shown both during the day and at night.

 

Airport Bergamo for X-Plane 11

This video of Airport Bergamo for X-Plane highlights the high-quality ground and building textures, the wide variety of accurately placed custom objects, the 50cm/pixel aerial imagery with hand-placed autogen, the use of dynamic lighting and the custom-generated jetways. Our review of this fine scenery add-on starts on page 24.

Fly the Maddog X Tutorial - Preliminary Cockpit Preparation

This is a comprehensive walk-through of the pre-start preliminary cockpit preparation of Fly the Maddog X – a review for which starts on page 16. Every aspect is covered, from powering up the aircraft through to making sure that the flaps/slats are up, the speed brakes are retarded and disarmed and testing the PA/emergency lights. You will also hear the communication between the various crew members as they go through the check procedures.

 

SkunkCrafts’ P-51D Mustang for X-Plane 11

This promotional video highlights some of the key features of this fabulous rendition of the iconic P-51D Mustang from SkunkCrafts, a review for which starts on page 68. Starting with the beautifully rendered external model, we are then taken inside to view the extreme attention to detail present in the cockpit area, which includes subtle weathering throughout. You will then hear the highly immersive FMOD sounds of the switches and levers being operated and the Packard Merlin engine being fired up, on take-off and in flight.

 

DCS: Christen Eagle II

This presentation of the aerobatic DCS: Christen Eagle II showcases the aircraft’s extreme manoeuvrability. Highlights also include an impressive three-ship aerial display, encompassing smoke and the aircraft taking part in a Red Bull-type obstacle course race. Our review starts on page 28.

 

Just Flight’s PA28-181 Archer III for X-Plane

Reviewed on pages 32-34, the trailer for Just Flight’s Archer III conveys the very high production values of this superb simulation. Showcased are the superbly detailed and crisp internal and external features, which includes the photorealistic cockpit rendition, metallic look of the external finish, the comprehensive menu system and the night lighting.

Virtual Airlines

We have some interesting newcomers to our VA and flying club listing for you. Take a look to see if there is one to suit your taste. The experience and fun of being part of a virtual club or airline are second to none.

PC Pilot Index

Looking for a review on a particular product, feature or tutorial? Then look no further. Our regularly updated PC Pilot Index includes references (with accompanying issue and page numbers) to all our past reviews of software and hardware as well as features, tutorials and more. Now you can find that elusive article you’ve been looking for.

Utilities

You’ll need WinZip and Acrobat Reader for reading PDF documents and opening Zip files.

 

Reviews - Screenshot Galleries

 

To help give our readers a better appreciation of the products reviewed in this issue, we have compiled the screenshots accompanying some of the articles into a series of galleries.

Once again we have a collection of high-quality freeware files for you to enjoy. These aircraft, scenery and utilities easily compare with many commercial products but don’t forget, if you’ve enjoyed a particular file please let the author know; it’s their only payback. By the same token we’re always interested to hear from you if you’ve downloaded or designed a file that you think is worth sharing. By Joe Lavery

Ryan Navion 205 Vintage Aircraft

We travel back a few years with the aircraft featured in this issue; it’s a Ryan Navion 205, built in the United States in the 1940s. Although finally produced by the Ryan Aeronautical Company, it was originally designed and built by North American Aviation, builder of the North American P-51 Mustang. In fact, if you have a good look at it, you can see the resemblance.

Star Performers from the Internet

1: ATR72-500 1.2.0

The ATR 72 is a twin-engine turboprop, short-haul regional airliner developed and produced in France and Italy by aircraft manufacturer ATR. The aircraft depicted here was designed for X-Plane 11 by Christian Riviere. Author: Christian Riviere Platform: X-Plane 11

2: Courtenay Airpark CAH3

Courtenay Airpark is located next to Courtenay, British Columbia, Canada. It’s the largest city on the east coast of Vancouver Island, commonly known as the Comox Valley and was designed by the prolific Charles Macelli for X-Plane 11.

Author: Charles Macelli

Platform: X-Plane 11

3: Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer

The Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer, is a World War Two- and Korean Warera patrol bomber used by the United States Navy. The model depicted here is nr R582 Miss Sea-Ducer and was designed for FSX/P3D by A.F Scrub.

Author: A.F Scrub

Platform: FSX/P3Dv3-4

The idea was that an aircraft with such a pedigree would perfectly match the expected post-war boom in civilian aviation.

The aircraft depicted here was designed for X-Plane 11 by Texasranger of vFlyteAir Simulations. It’s a fine piece of work that recreates that aircraft to a very high standard, including a user guide and a full 97-page Pilot’s Manual. The cockpit is fully operational with a superb amount of ageing and weathering. Paint is flaking off, there are a few rust spots here and there, even some subtle wear on the panel lettering; it all looks very authentic. The cockpit also features a working windscreenmounted eTablet; however you do need to download a free plug-in for this to work.

The fuselage is mainly polished aluminium (like many of the P-51s), so it seems to have ‘weathered’ a bit better. A closer look reveals the subtle stains and small imperfections that aircraft of this age are bound to have.vFlyteAir Simulations also produces commercial aircraft and this could easily have been one as well, it’s just brilliant. Author: Texasranger of vFlyteAir Simulations Platform: X-Plane 11

4: Ireland West Airport Knock

Officially known as Ireland West Airport Knock, this airport is 5.6km (3.5 miles) southwest of Charlestown, County Mayo, in Ireland. This very detailed production for X-Plane 11 was designed by Cian O Riordan.

Author: Cian O Riordan

Platform: X-Plane 11

5: Stanfield Int. Airport CYZH, Halifax

This is a Canadian airport in Goffs, a rural area of Halifax, Nova Scotia. It serves Halifax, mainland Nova Scotia and adjacent areas in the neighbouring Maritime Provinces. It’s been designed for FSX by Sidney Schwartz.

Author: Sidney Schwartz

Platform: FSX

6: Sukhoi-57 T50 Stealth Fighter

The Sukhoi-57 T50 is a fifth-generation superiority fighter that made its first flight in 2010. It will enter service in 2019 and was designed to replace the Su-27. This detailed version was produced for FSX, P3D and FS2004 by Erwin Welker.

Author: Erwin Welker

Platform: P3D/FSX/FS2004

Top: You can see the resemblance between the Navion and the P-51 Mustang.

Above: The developer has produced a stunninglooking aircraft.

Right: The cockpit certainly shows the age of this aircraft.

Left: There’s not much paintwork but where there is it’s beautifully done.

Facing page: That aluminium skin is like a mirror.

7: Ganja International Airport

Ganja International Airport serves Ganja (also known as Gyandzha), which is the second largest city in Azerbaijan. This version for FSX was designed by Reza Sadri.

Author: Reza Sadri

Platform: FSX

8: Republic XF-91 Thunderceptor

Quite an unusual 1950s aircraft, the Republic XF-91 Thunderceptor was a prototype jet fighter for the US Air Force. It featured an inverse tapered wing that provided better lift on landing. It was designed by Uenoshing.

Author: Uenoshing

Platform: FSX

PERMISSION

Although the authors of these files have very kindly given us their permission to include them on our website, they still remain the property and copyright of the authors. You are free to enjoy them for your own use but they must not in any circumstances be distributed, copied, uploaded to any other websites or disassembled in any way whatsoever.

Library files

Most X-Plane users will already know that many freeware airport designers make use of the freeware Library files to enhance their creations. Consequently, it’s important to read the documentation within each file, to find out which libraries have been used. These library files need to be installed in order to experience these airports as the authors intended.