South American Eagle

Tony Butler shares the story of the twin- engine I.A.e 30 Ñancú – and how it was too little too late for piston power

The prototype Ñancú awaiting paint at Córdoba. Like its predecessor, the type had an uncanny resemblance to a de Havilland product, notably the DH.103 Hornet.
PHOTOS ROLLS-ROYCE HERITAGE TRUST • FUERZA AEREA ARGENTINA HISTORICAL RECORDS • SANTIAGO RIVAS • HUGH COWIN

Following World War Two, many Italian and German aeronautical designers moved to Argentina for the chance to continue working in their chosen field. At the time the country’s aircraft industry was in a fledgling state. However, one prototype produced soon after the war was an advanced piston-engined fighter from the Instituto Aerotécnico( I.A.e), the I.A.e 30 Ñancú. The name was derived from an indigenous Patagonian eagle.

Become a Premium Member to Read More

This is a premium article and requires an active Key.Aero subscription to view.

I’m an existing member, sign me in!

I don’t have a subscription…

Enjoy the following subscriber only benefits:

  • Unlimited access to all KeyAero content
  • Exclusive in-depth articles and analysis, videos, quizzes added daily
  • A fully searchable archive – boasting hundreds of thousands of pieces of quality aviation content
  • Access to read all our leading aviation magazines online - meaning you can enjoy the likes of FlyPast, Aeroplane Monthly, AirForces Monthly, Combat Aircraft, Aviation News, Airports of the World, PC Pilot and Airliner World - as soon as they leave the editor’s desk.
  • Access on any device- anywhere, anytime
  • Choose from our offers below