Sturdy and utilitarian

TECHNICAL DETAILS

DE HAVILLAND DRAGON

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Wartime Australian Dragon manufacturing showing the fuselages being built up in the Mascot factory.
THE COLLECTION VIA G. GOODALL AND R. JAHNE

The DH84 Dragon had an all-wooden structure. The fuselage was built up as a plywood box, supported by spruce longerons and stringers. The biplane wings and tail were made of wooden spars (solid spruce routed to L-sections) and ribs, the wings and control surfaces were fabric-covered, and the fuselage and fixed empennage had a ply covering, with fabric overall. Access to control runs beneath the fuselage was provided by zip fasteners or lacing in the underside of the fuselage. The fixed horizontal tail was adjustable for trim by a screw-jack on the front spar. The rudder was balanced. The whole structure was covered with a nitro-cellulose finish, and the rear fuselage longerons with three-ply covering were treated with bitumastic paint to protect against condensation.

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