De Havilland

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of de Havilland, Key.Aero is launching a special week of bespoke videos on September 21 that pays homage to a true aviation pioneer. From the humble beginnings of the Humming Bird and the ground-breaking Hornet Moth, through to the staggering engineering of the DH88 Comet and mighty Mosquito, this video series charts both the aircraft and the fascinating details that form the history of one of Britain's most iconic aircraft manufacturers. 

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Venoms of the East

Malcolm Payne remembers his days flying with 28 Squadron in Hong Kong...

Restoring a de Havilland Sea Venom

Getting a 1950s naval jet fighter back to its original condition is a painstaking business…

De Havilland's all-wooden wartime assault glider

In the pre-helicopter age, sending troops behind enemy lines meant packing them into a plywood glider like this…

The Vampire and the jet age

Originally called the Spider Crab, the Vampire ushered in a new era for de Havilland, and was used by some air forces until the end of the 1980s.

The airliner that changed aviation forever

On Sir Geoffrey de Havilland’s 67th birthday in 1949, the aircraft that propelled the world into the jet age took to the skies for the first time. Key Aero examines the history of the revolutionary DH.106 Comet

The ground-attack Mosquito that used cigarette technology

Used for daring, low-flying raids, the Mosquito FB MkVI packed huge firepower – partly thanks to some ingenious thinking from an unlikely source.

The Mosquito’s 272kg bomb

Known as the ‘Highball’, only 200 were ever made. Watch footage of one that was raised up from the bottom of a Scottish loch – 74 years after being dropped by a Mosquito from 618 Squadron.

Made of wood, held together with four bolts: de Havilland’s WW2 game-changer

From being turned down by the Ministry of Defence to becoming de Havilland’s greatest wartime aircraft, the story behind the Mosquito – and the incredible engineering behind it – showed aviation ingenuity at its very best.

Inside the de Havilland Mosquito B35 bomber

Watch our video of the Mosquito’s interior – these are the conditions that pilots and navigators faced…

Royal New Zealand Air Force and the Mosquito

Two months’ of meticulous planning, calculated to deliver the decisive blow, was unleashed by the Allies at 13:00 hours on February 22, 1945. A massive daylight offensive was targeting enemy transport and communication systems.