Monoply in Engines

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If i am not wrong RR has the monoply in engine making closely folowed by GE, CFM etc. But according to an article in Business A.M.(scotland), GE are ahead of them in technology buy quite a distance. But still airlines go for RR. BA is a big customer of RR, so is SIA, Qantas, KLM. I fail to understand why?? If GE is ahead in technology, then why not GE, why only RR. In cases like this, Air France do experements, they took the CFM for there 777s. The only experement i have seen BA doing is the induction of the A320s in there fleet, which they are quite satisfied with. Does anyone knows what engines has SAS chosen for its A340/330s??? regards Kabir
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RE: Monoply in Engines This is from SAS website: "April 19, 2001 SAS decided to select the Rolls-Royce Trent 772B engine to power the new Airbus A330-300 aircraft fleet." V2500 is selected for 321
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RE: Monoply in Engines Thank you for the info.:)

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RE: Monoply in Engines If RR are so behind in engine technology why do both American engine companies use RR developed single crystal technology for turbine blades and still use twin axle engines not triple as RR. Could this be another knock a top UK success by the press

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RE: Monoply in Engines Rolls Royce engines are usually better with regards to the amount of fuel they consume, they do tend to be very durable as well. The RB211-535E4 (which powers the 757 series) is a notable powerplant which can last for a very long time before an engine change is required. Emirates will announce a huge 60 aircraft order at the Paris Air show, comprising of 777's and the A330-200. All are going to be powered by the RR Trent. I seriously doubt other aero engine makers are ahead of RR in terms of technology.
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RE: Monoply in Engines Well, the new CFM T3568 or somethin like that will be out in about 2 months is going to beat them all according to aviation analysist. Ofcourse the Trent is the best engine one could get, but GE's technology is a step ahead.

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RE: Monoply in Engines LAST EDITED ON 22-05-01 AT 04:38 PM (GMT)[p]I have heard that RR engines are not so heavy as GE or PW.

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RE: Monoply in Engines I don't know enough about aero engine design to say which is best, but all of the major players such as RR and GE build good, proven engines such as the RB211 and CFM56. I find that a carrier will order engines as a polictical move. BA always orders RR powered aircraft, I'd bet because the engines are build in Derby, England. OK, I know BA have many GE90 powered 777's, but the latest batch of -200ER's are powered by the Trent. Then, most US airlines will buy aircraft with GE engines. The United 747 fleet are all powered by US built engines, and most P&W powered 757's are operated by the likes of Delta and Northwest. On the other side of the atlantic, you'll find such aircraft types powered by RR engines. I'm not saying that all European operators of the 747 fly RR powered examples, I know Air France and Lufthansa don't, but how many US 747 operators use RR powered examples?

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RE: Monoply in Engines BA used GE engines for their first 777`s because GE were desparate to get a major airline as both AA and DL chose RR and UA chose P&W which left GE with just Continental in the US so they made BA a deal the maintain all BA`s engines for a set period of time at a knock down price as an insentive. Unfortunately the GE engines suffered early teething problems which delayed BA`s launch. I dont think many customers have chosen GE to power their 777`s most have chosen P&W or RR
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RE: Monoply in Engines 3rd batch of Northwest B747 are powered by RR.

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RE: Monoply in Engines Hi there, Generally Airlines don't change engines unless something like fuel comsumption is too high, or unexceptable maintainence is required. Remember the engine is the most critical part of the plane, with standing turbine temp of about 1000c(not exact), and outside air temp of -50, and then having to be able to swallow large bird, and then producing 100,000lbs after it, it is quite demanding, and airline have to pick the right engines for the job. The American Airline might go for the P&W engines because they operate better at higher tempetures, and the british go for RR coz they work better at cold temps Matthew
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RE: Monoply in Engines Totally agreed Mathew, but its not only the temprature that is seen in chosing an engine. Of course the engine is the basic part, but i think its experience which also goes in chosing an engine. BA has a tremendous experience with RR so the stick to it, they are not very risk taking like Air France. KLM, one of the oldest airlines in the world are RR customers. RR being the one of the oldest engine makers, have advantage which is leaving little room for new players as GE.

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RE: Monoply in Engines Does anybody know what kind of engines the A380 will be powered by? This aircraft is vast and I can see it being powered by four Trent powerplants. I think the A340-600 is powered by the Trent isn't it? If so, I bet that bird can climb like a rocket. I always thought that the earlier A340 variants were a bit underpowered. Am I right in saying that Boeing 757's powered by the PW2040 have slightly more thrust than their RR counterparts? I thnk the P&W engines deliver around 41,000lbs of thrust compared to the RB211-535E4's 40,000lbs. Saying that, both are very powerful for the size of the aircraft.
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RE: Monoply in Engines The A380 most proberbly will be powered by GE's new engines which are specially made for the A380. Atleast the prototype will be powered by the GE's new engines. The A340-600 is powered by 4 Trents, usually the 340 is powered by CFM. Yes the 757 has slightly larger quantity of thrust, thats only 1,000 lbs more so that it dosent affect much.

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RE: Monoply in Engines Launch customers SIA and Qantas have opted for the Trent for the A380, so that's what will be used for the Prototypes.
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RE: Monoply in Engines Thank you for correcting me Bhoy:)