R110 000 /$16 000 for a Tomahawk

I came across a Piper Tomahawk on an Internet site for R110 000. (That is about $16 000 to our American friends). 0 time on the engine and prop. I have done some searches on the internet to find out if this would be a good buy, and have read some rumors and some good feedbacks on this plane.

I have 72 hours on my log, so I'm still kind of a newbie. Most of these (42) on a 152. I have no knowledge whatsoever about the Tomahawk. Can someone please advise? Is this a good buy? Has anyone on here flown the Tomahawk?
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Moggy C

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19 years 9 months

Posts: 16,831

The PA38 is a hundred times nicer to fly than a 152 and it makes a great first aircraft. I did all my ab initio training on one.

The price sounds on the low side of OK. The important thing though is the hours on the engine. If it had been heading up to 2,000 then you would have had a sizeable bill for replacement coming very shortly. However as this one apparently has a zero time prop and engine yet is being advertised for a sum not far off the cost of a new / rebuilt prop and engine you are right to be a little wary.

The cynical amongst us might suspect since you took the trouble to identify the site selling the aircraft in your very first post on this Forum that you were actually just punting the sale.

I, of course, in my roles as moderator have no such suspicions. But just to save you embarrassment I took the link out anyway.

Moggy
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J Boyle

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14 years 11 months

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Seems like a good buy, I think it would be in here in the US anyway.

I was looking (long distance via the web) at a nice 1962 "Razorback" 150 with polished metal and factory trim paint (they say early 150s are nicer to fly and lighter than later ones) and it's $17.5K with an engine due for overhaul.

You might compare prices on the Trade-A-Plane or Barnstormers sites.
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RyanShort1

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11 years 7 months

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I did all my Private Pilot Certificate training in Tomahawks. They are good, straightforward, and fun trainers that have a few quirks.

That said, there are a few issues with them.

First off, they have a life-limited wing. If you reach the limit on the wing, the airplane is done unless it gets the STC mod which can extend it by a significant number.

Second, I know a guy who was on the procurement team for Piper and had significant involvement in the Tomahawk program. The T-tail wasn't the original design, and according to some people, you can see some interesting things if you watch it during a stall. I never did, and have never had a problem with the plane.

I'd want to see 20-25 hours minimum on the engine, or some sort of warranty on the engine before committing to buy the plane.

Be aware also that a lot of planes are selling for a fair bit less than their asking price. I recently saw a local Champ advertised for $18,000 USD that actually sold for $10,000 USD cash.

Ryan
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Moggy C

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I understood it was in the spin, rather than the stall that it wagged its tail?

Personally I was always more concerned with recovering the spin than looking over my shoulder to see what was happening.

Moggy
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27vet

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9 years 10 months

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I can't see it, it must have been sold already (that is a good price for a zero time engine).

Ok I found it and they are selling "as is" and it was a rebuild project so maybe there is a lot of work to be done. Chris, it probably requires an airplane mechanic to assemble it.

Moreorless

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Tomahawk wing life limit is 11,000 hours. ;)

Rockwell Commander range (112 and 114s) also has a wing life limit, which varies between models.