How low is too low?

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16 years 2 months

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This may seem like a stupid question but I'm sure there is a wealth of stories out there that could be told. Years ago when I was in Cyprus I used to glide from Kingsfield (Dhekelia) and at the time there was a water tank just off the south side at the West end of the runway. This was in a compound with flood lights. Anyway one day a visiting pilot flew his base leg very close in to the field as he was getting low and ended up overflying the water tank. His remark on landing was "Did you know those floodlights are made by Mazda?" As he is an American I think he probably had the Mazda car company in mind rather than the Mazda electriacal company the us Brits know. The question is was he too low?
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9 years 5 months

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Too Low? If he made the runway/landing area he wasnt too low. If he did not make the runway/landing area he was too low. Joking apart was he in a glider/sailplane or powered a/c? He was commited to land so if in a glider the cicuit would be adjusted to ensure an arrival on the landing area, no good flying a normal circuit and landing short. With regard to Mazda he was obviously a jolly fellow, who enjoyed a laugh. Did you say he was American? Happy landings!!!!!
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9 years 4 months

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I know for a fact, that the Lancs( Dam busters) when practising over our area, used to fly UNDER the electricity pylons over the river Nene, which leads to the WASH. Now, thats what you call, LOW. Lincoln .7
Profile picture for user Arm Waver

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15 years 6 months

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That was indeed a little too low wasn't it? Well the chap who flew the Robinson for Top Gear has lost his licence - flying too close apparently as opposed to too low...
Profile picture for user Arm Waver

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15 years 6 months

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No that was a different chap.... IIRC the guy with the fine for "buzzing" the steam train was actually working for the owner of the loco but the chap on Top Gear landed the Robinson on top of a Skoda.

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10 years 1 month

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No that was a different chap.... IIRC the guy with the fine for "buzzing" the steam train was actually working for the owner of the loco but the chap on Top Gear landed the Robinson on top of a Skoda.
Do you have actual proof of the R22 pilot losing his licence? Thread here: http://www.pprune.org/rotorheads/439889-remember-when-top-gear-good.html Post #18 from the organiser of the Top Gear shoot says: As the organiser for this shoot, can I just step-in before the barrack room spins out of control? Car manufacturer design engineers (VW) consulted on loadings, mounting points, CoGs etc. Platform built and installed by the world's best film "action vehicles" engineers. CAA consulted and approvals obtained. (The Yeti, by the way, I would buy tomorrow. Excellent strength and load capabilities. No additional strengthening was needed and the "pad" bolted direct into the pillars that go straight into the main monocoque of the chassis. Standard roof loading no problem.) Whole exercise rehearsed successfully in incremental stages several weeks ahead. Speeds agreed. Course agreed. 2-way radio contact between car & heli. Agreed "break, break" procedure controlled by observer in camera car talking to pilot direct. So, topendtorque, hope you enjoy the real facts. And the 22 is an Instrument Trainer (no longer made) which spends its active life in instruction. The lights are a requirement by the UK CAA for night-flying by 22s. 44s also have similar kit for night.( When the 22 was first allowed to fly in a UK night it had to have a flare kit!) Still, don't let the facts get in the way of rumour....
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15 years 6 months

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I had the information from a very reliable source.

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16 years 2 months

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If he made the runway/landing area he wasnt too low. If he did not make the runway/landing area he was too low. Joking apart was he in a glider/sailplane or powered a/c? He was commited to land so if in a glider the cicuit would be adjusted to ensure an arrival on the landing area, no good flying a normal circuit and landing short. With regard to Mazda he was obviously a jolly fellow, who enjoyed a laugh. Did you say he was American? Happy landings!!!!!
Yep he made it to the airfield-just. As I recall by the time he made his base to finals turn he was so low he had to rudder turn to avoid hitting the wingtip on the ground.

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15 years 7 months

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I won't be the one to say this is TOO low, but it is low...... A glider whose final glide seems to defy gravity- perhaps you need to have done a little gliding to get the full sweaty palm effect.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZxvYMC2QvI

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16 years 2 months

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I know for a fact, that the Lancs( Dam busters) when practising over our area, used to fly UNDER the electricity pylons over the river Nene, which leads to the WASH. Now, thats what you call, LOW. Lincoln .7
Apparently on the flight out one of the tail gunners was astounded to see a canal bridge in Holland go over his head and complained to the pilot that he was paddling.
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12 years 2 months

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Is Cyprus the runway that goes out to sea? An old drinking buddy told me they took off in a Shackleton with quite a few passengers and barely cleared the waves and struggled into the air overloaded..The pilot was asked how high they were after take-off and he shouted " nothing on the clock but the makers name".