Help Pilot or not?

Profile picture for user chriswade

Member for

8 years 6 months

Posts: 74

im thinking about starting my PPL. i live very close to East mids airport so id use donair as they have a real good reputation. my only doubt is, is it really worth it? now im not that well off, so once id done my PPL what could i then do? obviously planes are very expensive things to buy and it seems if i buy a share theres a lot of fee's that come with each flight etc. so is this only for people with a lot of money? and also how hard will it be to continue onto commercial piloting? but again it will cost a hell of a lot to take the training etc. just want to hear peoples opinions who are already pilots :) thanks
Original post

Member for

13 years

Posts: 8,826

Once you have your PPL you can continue to hire the aircraft and take up friends etc... also you may find people to share with at the school, both go flying together etc, best bet is to give Gill a call on 01332 810444 and she will talk you though it, what it takes costs, how to go about it all ok :) you can also book a trial lesson BTW and this counts towards your hours, it will give you a taste of it, lets you have a go at flying it, lets you possibly see your house from the air or the area etc and see if you want to take it further. Any more info you want PM me ok . Not a pilot BTW but an engineer :) Also may be worth PM'ing Skymonster, he flies there.
Profile picture for user Moggy C

Member for

19 years 9 months

Posts: 16,831

Chris, taking up flying isn't something you do lightly. If you really NEED to fly you will. I know of one young lady pilot who every day she can cycle to work does so, and puts the bus fare saved towards her next flight. That sort of dedication is not untypical. Said quickly the costs sound horrific. Maybe about £7-9,000 in training alone to get your PPL. Then as you say you will have to pay to fly afterwards, or the whole exercise was pointless. No reason for not spreading this training out over a couple of years so it might end up costing you £50 - £70 a week Once you have qualified rental aircraft cost between £120 - £180 per flying hour to hire. You don't pay whilst it is sitting on the ground and you are eating your bacon butty at some distant airfield. Most PPLs half this cost by flying with a friend. One flies the outbound leg while the other does the nav and radio. Then they swap for the return leg. Shared aircraft certainly bring the costs down. Mine requires a subscription of £60 each month, after that I pay just £50 per flying hour. The important thing to remember is that the training is amongst the most fun flying you will ever do. You will be flying solo from around hour 15 - 20, so you get to be a real pilot quite quickly. It's not like driving, where you actually have to have your licence before you can have much fun. The 'trial lesson' is a great idea. That should make your mind up for you. Moggy

Member for

15 years 7 months

Posts: 3,892

Consider the microlight route, which no longer means a hanglider with a deckchair lashed underneath, and a chainsaw engine. They are very modern, capable aeroplanes, many of which will outperform older group A aircraft, at much reduced cost. Take a look at the Eurostar or the WT-9. A few moments looking online shows me a Microlight PPL in Northants for £3,500. If you are a recreational flyer, this could be the way to go. When paying for a course in advance, use a credit card for your protection, in case the company goes bust.

Member for

13 years 10 months

Posts: 66

I have to agree with moggy, if you really want to fly you will find a way. I recently got made redundant and fortunately recieved a decent payout. With this I am funding my training at the expense of a new kitchen. I realise I probably would have taken many more years to start without this injection of cash, but it also highlights the need for an understanding partner( she knows flying has been my lifes ambition and says it's important to achieve this at the expense of other things) as the initial cost sounds crippling. like you I'm not sure how I'll continue to fly after completing the training but i'm sure I'll find a way, and would have meet many intersting people along the way. Best of luck, I hope you find a way to fund your flying!
Profile picture for user Moggy C

Member for

19 years 9 months

Posts: 16,831

Great post! I funded my initial training with a lump sum that I took from the equity in my home when the marriage of the time broke up. It was a great way to shrug off a painful period in my life and open a new chapter. The flying has always been exciting and rewarding. Even flying into a snowstorm on my qualifying cross country. I've taken our PA22 right across Europe to Italy on three occasions and have lost count of the number of trips to take short breaks in Northern France. Le Touquet, Dieppe, Deauville, Dinard, Abbeville and small airfields outside Paris. I've had aeros instructions on Extra 300, flown Stearman, Tiger Moth, Bulldog. Owned a share in a Yak 52. Hand flown a Cessna 406 back from Belgium. If I look at my Facebook 'friends' a good 50% of them are pilots. The flying community is like that. Nothing better than landing at an airfield on the continent and unexpectedly bumping into a friend that has just arrived too. I sometimes look at my logbook and wonder what it has all cost me. Then I think, "It really doesn't matter, I've had experiences fewer than one person in a thousand ever will, and nobody can take those away from me". Moggy

Member for

16 years 2 months

Posts: 8,505

I have to agree with moggy, if you really want to fly you will find a way. I recently got made redundant and fortunately recieved a decent payout. With this I am funding my training at the expense of a new kitchen. I realise I probably would have taken many more years to start without this injection of cash, but it also highlights the need for an understanding partner( she knows flying has been my lifes ambition and says it's important to achieve this at the expense of other things) as the initial cost sounds crippling. like you I'm not sure how I'll continue to fly after completing the training but i'm sure I'll find a way, and would have meet many intersting people along the way. Best of luck, I hope you find a way to fund your flying!
Oh to have such an understanding other half, mine insists on replacing perfectly serviceable furniture if she's fed up with the style/colour etc. I am convinced she only does it to stop me spending the money on flying lessons. If she can find a reason to buy something expensive she will, knowing very well that she is getting up my nose every time. I think Moggy has said it all in that post.

Member for

16 years 3 months

Posts: 696

Don't over look gliding. I started gliding as a cheap alternative to powered flying & came to love it before the finances+time of buying & doing up a house + eyesight issues put a stop to it (for now). Gliding hours also count towards a ppl, though not nearly as much as they used to. Nothing quite like being airbourne in a glider, just the airframe with pressure driven instruments, no power or electrics what so ever & your skill to keep you aloft. Unfortunately you may come to regard engines as noisy, vibration generators that block your view & have the potential to go wrong. Due to the emphasis on the club environment you'll get to know people as you help out on the airfield with launching, ground handling etc followed by the bar (optional). Who knows what opportunities in aviation you might find with a bit of networking ! I thoroughly recommend it, though if time is a bit tight at weekends it might be worthwhile getting on a week long course to get to solo standard. Not mega expensive & most clubs run them now & again.