NPPL -More changes, more confusion.

Member for

15 years 7 months

Posts: 3,892

Received a message from my club today NPPL MEDICAL CHANGES An important information circular has been received by the club from the CAA concerning the ‘Extension of general exemption permitting the use of a medical declaration with pilot licences other than NPPL when flying SSEA, SLMG and Microlight aeroplanes’. The exemption has been re-issued and its validity extended until 30th June 2012. After this date you will need to have an NPPL Licence issued to continue using a GP issued medical declaration. CFI Can we still fly on a 'lifetime' PPL issued twenty years ago, or will we be gouged for a new licence , costing £xxxxx ?
Original post

Member for

15 years 7 months

Posts: 3,892

Have just spoken to a 'wise head' at NPPL HQ, and though very friendly and helpful, does not know either.....:confused: http://www.nationalprivatepilotslicence.co.uk/help.php The CAA have not yet decided, but something will appear in the press, and the new LAPL will probably require a flight test. Or something. What a dog's dinner :mad:

Member for

8 years 6 months

Posts: 6,467

#2 Propstrike. How true ! What a 'dogs dinner'. I'm convinced beyond all reasonable doubt that most of us, given a clean sheet of A4 and a pencil could, within half an hour, come up with a workable and understandable list of conditions for the issue and maintenance of non commercial private licences. It couldn't be simpler. Why are we paying aviation authorities vast (by my standards) sums to sit on their bottoms and issue the farrago that is being foisted on us. I've no doubt that sizeable numbers of people will simply give up on aviation. The complexity of trying to maintain one's licence and medical according to rules that seem to change by the day will be too much. John Green

Member for

16 years 2 months

Posts: 8,505

I think that if you consider who this is being forced on us by the question why are we paying vast(by our standards) sums answers itself. A government organisation will always charge the largest amount they can get away with for the least possible benefit to those affected and will always push through ill thought out legislation regardless of whether it is good or bad (nearly always the latter) purely because they can. The reason most of their decisions are detrimental to the case they are supposed to address is also simple - it is formulated by people with no experience of the subject they are dealing with.
Profile picture for user Moggy C

Member for

19 years 9 months

Posts: 16,831

I fly on a full Class 2 medical, but now I have shifted to an LAA type am more alert to this sort of thing. This seems to be the part relevant to me
Current UK CAA (lifetime) License holders: You may fly both EASA and non-EASA aircraft up until 7th April 2015. After this time, if you wish to fly EASA aircraft you will need to APPLY for an EASA PPL (known as PART-FCL) before this date. Note the onus is on YOU to take action. You will not automatically receive a new EASA PPL as JAR-PPL license holders will ! If you are a UK CAA (lifetime) PPL holder who has elected to have a "self-declare with their GP" medical - your license is deemed to be an NPPL (see below).
Moggy

Member for

16 years 2 months

Posts: 8,505

That sounds about right for government bodies to me. Charge us more for the privelege of doing their job for them. Grrrr. Don't get me started or we'll be here all day.l
Profile picture for user low'n'slow

Member for

13 years 1 month

Posts: 1,433

One can't entirely blame the CAA for this. They are trying to make sense of an even bigger mess that EASA has made of flight crew licensing across the whole of Europe. As far as fees are concerned, it is a long-time known fact that the CAA, uniquely as a safety/licensing body, is required by the Department for Transport to show a six percent profit on its turnover!! If you've got a beef with that, contact the Minister responsible, Justine (I don't want another Heathrow runway in my constituency) Greening!