Citation off Runway-Stupid Pilot!

Profile picture for user CSheppardholedi

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12 years 11 months

Posts: 586

Interesting video of a Citation that landed downwind on (and off) a wet runway. Ended up in the water. Everyone appears to get out OK. then the half submerged aircraft had an engine spool back up again and started propelling itself about the lake....some very scary moments! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juC7FQUV6pY
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13 years 5 months

Posts: 388

Awesome video! I think OY is a Finnish registration? Not the Flying Finn, more like the Diving Finn! Mind you, if that's what Atlantic City looks like, no wonder they introduced gambling... Bri :rolleyes: PS: Could language differences be the reason he landed at the wrong end of the runway?
Profile picture for user Kenneth

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19 years 9 months

Posts: 944

OY is Denmark and the aircraft in question was a CitationJet, OY-JET, and was "flown" by its owner. Do a search of the NTSB database with the registration and you get most of the interesting particulars. His brief swim in the Atlantic didnĀ“t put the owner off flying and he soon purchased a replacement. A Citation Sovereign, which he has registered (and this is not a joke:) OY-WET.... :p

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11 years 11 months

Posts: 2,101

Awesome video! I think OY is a Finnish registration? Not the Flying Finn, more like the Diving Finn! Mind you, if that's what Atlantic City looks like, no wonder they introduced gambling... Bri :rolleyes: PS: Could language differences be the reason he landed at the wrong end of the runway?
English is the international language of Air Traffic is it not? However, Prince Phil once said that USA and GB were two countries seperated by a common language.....but joined at the Atlantic. Why was the whole thing being filmed? I mean right from the start? Did pilot declare an emergency and go straight in on "Any" available runway pointing in any direction?
Profile picture for user Joe Petroni

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16 years 4 months

Posts: 624

Should answer the questions, from the NTSB accident report; ''The pilot performed "a low pass" over the runway, and then touched down approximately 1,000 feet beyond the approach end of the 2,948-foot long runway, with a tailwind of approximately 10 knots. After touchdown, the airplane continued off the end of the runway, and subsequently impacted water. According to the Cessna 525A Landing Distance Chart, an airplane with a landing weight of 11,400 pounds required 3,000 feet of landing distance, in a no wind situation. With a 10 knot tailwind, the airplane required 3,570 feet of landing distance. The published airport diagram for the airport, was observed attached to the pilot's control column after the accident. A notation, which read, "airport closed to jet aircraft" was observed on the diagram. Additionally, the same notation, "Arpt CLOSED to jet traffic," was observed in the FAA Airport/Facility Directory. Examination of the airplane revealed no mechanical deficiencies. The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: The pilot's improper decision to plan a flight to a runway of insufficient length, his improper in-flight decision to land on that inadequate runway with a tailwind, and his failure to obtain the proper touchdown point. A factor in the accident was the tailwind condition.''

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13 years 5 months

Posts: 388

English is the international language of Air Traffic is it not?
True, but not all people pronounce the language the same. Bri :)