Am I?

Member for

16 years 3 months

Posts: 8,505

Am I the only person who considers that the CAA (in present form) has outlived its purpose? Actually that is a poor choice of wording. As an organisation it obviously still has a function to perform, it's the form of the CAA organisation which is well past its sell by date. They appear to bow to pressure from the airlines whilst doing as little for GA as they can get away with. They also appear to make regulations just because they can. We are constantly told the change is for improved safety when results from around the worldwide piloting fraternity indicate that the opposite is true. I fear the nickname 'Campaign Against Aviation' is increasingly justified to the extent that it should now be their official title. I'm sure that others can see the faults with the CAA as it stands as well as I (a non-pilot). Having said that, like all things faulty, there is no point in changing it for the sake of change. the changes would need to effect real improvement to be worthwhile.
Original post

Member for

11 years 7 months

Posts: 46

The CAA... don't get me started! You are not alone! Since I gained my PPL in 1996, I have seen a steady increase in regulation and costs on the private pilot, and precious little to applaud. Part of the problem is obviously Europe where rules are invented without reference to real life by a bunch of people who cannot even get auditors to sign off their own books, far less be accountable about their expenses, so how can we trust their decisions? However, the CAA is to an extent cuplable as they (for instance) managed to persuade themselves and the government that the effect of changing the flight crew licensing would have no cost impact on the PPL holder. I can understand commercial pilots having just one set of rules, but why did anyone think there was a need to enforce the same standards for PRIVATE pilots across Europe? Then there's Mode S which brings no benefits to the PPL but will do to airlines and UAV-makers, but the GA owner has to pay for the new kit. Another thing which should be addressed is that the CAA makes rules and also enforces them. This is pretty unusual if you think about it, and has led to some silly prosecutions for low flying which were dismissed, but should never have been brought in the first place.
Profile picture for user BlueRobin

Member for

19 years 10 months

Posts: 2,606

You may want to read this speech regarding EASA's function. The CAA will become more an instigator of policy rather than a creator.

Member for

16 years 3 months

Posts: 8,505

As usual we'll comply without question whilst Germany will pretend to enforce the rules but not take too much notice if people don't comply(most un-German behaviour) and the French will continue to obey the rules they agree with and ignore the ones they don't.

Member for

15 years 7 months

Posts: 3,892

As the function of the CAA changes, and much of their workload transfers to Europe, will we see a corresponing reduction of the workforce and cutting of operational costs? Dream on........................

Member for

16 years 3 months

Posts: 8,505

I should think not. They'll find some other con to make sure they don't lose any staff. As they appear to be very ineffective in fighting our corner against Europe we may as well close the CAA and let the EASA do the whole lot. On second thoughts that would be worse than keeping the CAA in its present form.