WikiLeaks

Member for

11 years 2 months

Posts: 523

I think its good for him to be in custody- If not, i dont see him seeing December next year- I mean the CIA does almost what it wants, and with a large section of the US happy to see him dead, something could happen.

But on what hes doing, He should be charged with assisting with treason in the US- he could have gone to the US and handed back the documents, publishing them leaves him guilty of assisting in treason.also possibly extortion(if something happens to me I'll release more)

Member for

9 years 9 months

Posts: 1,234

Ah, but no!

In my part of England - the bit wedged between Wales and the Lake District - "tea" is the evening meal, as well as a beverage.

In this particular instance a rather tasty chicken in white wine sauce pie topped with a tarragon scone, washed down with a nicely-chilled Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc. :)


My part of the World too. But I was brung up proppa.
Breakfast.
11's 's
Lunch
Tiffins
Tea
Dinner
Supper

Today....in the order above: -
A smoked Kipper, a cream cake (Birthday at work), Portion of Chips (No cheese today), Bacon and Brie with Chilli jam roll, I missed Tea, Dinner was Roast Beef and 7 veg plus spuds.
Tonights supper (This minute) is a Packet of jaffa cakes (Cheap copies not originals - but still only 12 off) and a pint of Yorkshire tea.

Profile picture for user J Boyle

Member for

15 years 1 month

Posts: 9,664

I mean the CIA does almost what it wants..

That's not what we hear. :D Sure you're not watching a film? :D
Everytime the CIA wants to do anything they're:
1. opposed by the liberals (and you can certainly make a case that reduced foreign intelligence and cutbacks of the CIA that go back as far as the Carter administration and the late Senator Frank Church...may he rot in hell...a nasty piece of work) or
2. outed by the media (if it hadn't been wikileaks, it would have easily been The New York Times).

In any case, the neglect of those intelligence networks probably led to 9-11.

On the plus side, think of what hasn't come up in these leaks..no talk of sinister doings of "start the war for oil" and other popular fables and conspiracy nonsense.

And don't worry about the CIA doing anyone in... if he gets hit by a bus, or dies of a disease, the CIA will get blamed and a lot of the third world will believe that they "did him in" so he's safe. Besides, Obama doen't have the guts to order a hit on anyone, however justified.
But that may not protect him from a Swedish jail for his alleged sex crimes.

Member for

13 years 2 months

Posts: 9,690

As usual, many Europeans don't see the harm as long as it's aimed only at America and not them. Rather like their stance on radical Islam and terrorism in general. As the English like to say..."I'm alright, Jack."

A sort of European isolationism you mean? Hmm.....isolationism.....now where have I heard that expression before? :rolleyes:

Member for

9 years 9 months

Posts: 1,234

Sometimes though, matters of principle mean more than you throwing yourself on your sword and moving on. In situations where there is a culture of bad practice and maybe even corruption, one resignation is hardly going to rock the world of those guilty of carrying out bad practice or their management who like the savings bad practice leads to. Sometimes more is necessary, much more than one person's complaint could provide.

An example. In another lifetime I worked for two and a half shifts at an unnamed nursing home. The first shift I was wary of the practices going on there. I spoke to a superior at the start of my second shift but was told to mind my own business and just get on with the job. I walked out in the middle of my third shift because a man was clearly dying, unnecessarily, and the senior staff would not call an ambulance. Would it have been right for me to just walk away and leave that man to die? This man, and others, were suffering because of a culture of bad practice not only condoned but actively supported by senior management.

I did walk out in the middle of my shift. And at the first phone box I came to I dialled 999 and requested an ambulance. I then informed the local authority of all that I had witnessed and the reasoning behind the actions I had taken. These things I did not do anonymously. Was it the right thing to do? I have never regretted it. I later learned that the client had survived, but only by the skin of his teeth.

What I am trying clumsily to say is that sometimes, just sometimes, you have to make a stand. Sometimes it's not about the tenets of something like the Official Secrets Act, or loyalty to an employer, or even the simple self interest of keeping a job. Sometimes it's simply about doing the right thing.

Regards,

kev35

Ah, but in this case, you were 100% right, you know you were, we know you were. Normal human decency prevails. But most people cannot walk out of a job on principle, there isn't another job to walk into. I am prepared (Physically) to walk out of my job. Desk/office is now void of personal gear and has been for 3 months. I'm gonna blow I tell ya! Emotionally prepared also. I detest the place and hold zero loyalty thoughts.
Back on....
If you found top secret MoD/DoD papers, even if they describe something you totally disagree with......I'm sure you wouldn't sell them to the highest bidder or even post them to the newspapers? Would you?
I wouldn't.

Profile picture for user J Boyle

Member for

15 years 1 month

Posts: 9,664

A sort of European isolationism you mean? Hmm.....isolationism.....now where have I heard that expression before? :rolleyes:

Don't blame us...it's you guys that pissed off Hitler. :D

Profile picture for user Grey Area

Member for

15 years 8 months

Posts: 10,160

Don't blame us...it's you guys that pissed off Hitler. :D

Godwin!!!!!! :diablo:

Member for

19 years 11 months

Posts: 527

Please tell me what good comes from printing a list of installations important to Amerixcan security.

I agree on your point. Whistleblowing is one thing, but I wonder about WikiLeaks' motives concerning that particular document.

As usual, many Europeans don't see the harm as long as it's aimed only at America and not them. Rather like their stance on radical Islam and terrorism in general.

It seems to me that these issues have gained more attention among a great deal of Europeans over time, especially after some of the events connected to the cartoon debate in 2005.

Member for

19 years 11 months

Posts: 2,886

It does seem to me to be a huge coincidence that Assange is accused of sex crimes the day after he annoyed many of the world's governments, but the nature of the charges seems a little ridiculous as well.

http://www.youtube.com/user/TheYoungTurks#p/u/8/2M_Q-mujYQ0

Yes it does seem to be a strange 'coincidence'. These articles have certainly had me spellbound and have certainly done nothing to alter my already poor regard of US governments, or anyone else's come to that. I should point out that I have no problem at all with the American people, but I've no time for their system of government. As for various comments in the media and forums ref the uncovering of other nations secrets, how can anyone be sure that it will not happen. After all, who saw WikiLeaks coming? Mr Assange is now at the mercy of the courts, the big question is: Who's pulling the strings and greasing the palms?

Member for

10 years 2 months

Posts: 4,956

Spellbound, eh? Well, each to his own - personally I have found 90% of what we have read rather unsurprising and pedestrian.

Member for

19 years 11 months

Posts: 2,886

Spellbound, eh? Well, each to his own - personally I have found 90% of what we have read rather unsurprising and pedestrian.

Well at the very least it's more interesting than reading about who's won X Factor, upcoming Royal weddings, the 2012 Olympics, the weather etc etc...;)

As you say, "Each to his own"

Profile picture for user 27vet

Member for

10 years 1 month

Posts: 2,670

Well the BBC are probably having a lot of fun relaying all the leaks.

Profile picture for user Flygirl

Member for

11 years 7 months

Posts: 5,339

Well the BBC are probably having a lot of fun relaying all the leaks.

:D:D So true!

Profile picture for user BumbleBee

Member for

10 years 9 months

Posts: 1,549

So is Julian Assange a public menace or a real hero ?
I can't make my mind up which it is.

Profile picture for user Grey Area

Member for

15 years 8 months

Posts: 10,160

Whatever he may, or may not, be he is currently being held (almost completely incommunicado) in solitary confinement for 23.5 hours a day despite not having even been charged with any crime, let alone tried and found guilty of one.

If he were a Burmese politician - or a Chinese artist - our Government (and that of the USA) would be demanding his release in the most forthright of terms, and we would all be nodding our heads in agreement.

What are we becoming? :(

"He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster." Friedrich Nietzsche