WikiLeaks

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19 years 10 months

Posts: 527

Otherwise, whistleblowers from all countries will start doing the same. (...) God bless the whistleblowers.
I think blowing the whistle in cases of illegal activities and attempts of cover-up etc. is one thing which is more easily justifiable. Many people seem to support the idea. Hasn't the U.S. government tried to provide a service for this purpose? In my opinion, handing out classified information pertaining to e.g. national security (such as lists of critical sites) is different. I fail to see what this has to do with freedom of speech. As others have pointed out before me, a great deal of the information recently provided by WikiLeaks seems more or less trivial, old news etc. Much of it seems to be of more interest to parts of the media rather than the respective governments. Again, what do they hope to achieve with information which has nothing to do with whistleblowing?

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10 years 1 month

Posts: 4,956

Primate - "Again, what do they hope to achieve with information which has nothing to do with whistleblowing?" A good question for Mr Assange, but one the sycophantic media seem to have ommitted to ask him......
Profile picture for user Grey Area

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15 years 7 months

Posts: 10,160

Yes, I am generally sceptical.:) Just the way I was brought up, I suppose....you do like your bold typeface, don't you?;)
It's a Mod thing (the bold typeface) - they have a weekly allowance but it has to be used up - no accruing bold typeface to the next week........ :)
You're both going on The List...... :mad: ;)

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10 years 1 month

Posts: 4,956

Oh, no - not..... The List - please spare us....!:eek::eek:
Profile picture for user Grey Area

Member for

15 years 7 months

Posts: 10,160

Too late! I've even underlined your names. Twice.

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10 years 1 month

Posts: 4,956

Curses - these Mods are always too quick for us, when they've just been fed and watered....:diablo:

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19 years 10 months

Posts: 2,886

I am sure that even if the sex charges don't stick on Assange, they will find something else. He must be punished to make an example out of him. Otherwise, whistleblowers from all countries will start doing the same. By the way, a new aspiring site has come up. Maybe soon we will have our "euroleaks". :D http://brusselsleaks.com/ God bless the whistleblowers.
My thoughts exactly. And to keep on blaming the media won't wash.:mad:

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10 years 1 month

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Can there really be anything worse than we already know about "Brussels"??:(

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19 years 10 months

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Euroleaks is fine by me. I look forward to seeing more of them.

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10 years 1 month

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With that I cannot disagree, but will be amazed if we find out anything new!

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13 years 1 month

Posts: 9,689

So with Assange under house-arrest in the UK pending extradition to Sweden to face sexual-assault charges, and the US possibly preparing an extradition to the US to face espionage charges, where will he end up? The US (which has an 'express' extradition treaty with the UK) or Sweden (which doesn’t)? :rolleyes:
Profile picture for user Grey Area

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15 years 7 months

Posts: 10,160

Ask yourself which of those countries has, over the past decade or so, developed a taste for imprisoning foreign nationals who are accused of no crime within their civil jurisdiction (without necessarily bothering overmuch with minor details like due process) and I suspect that you'll have your answer. I, for one, wish it were otherwise, but there you go....
Profile picture for user Aspis

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10 years 9 months

Posts: 971

I think blowing the whistle in cases of illegal activities and attempts of cover-up etc. is one thing which is more easily justifiable. Many people seem to support the idea. Hasn't the U.S. government tried to provide a service for this purpose? In my opinion, handing out classified information pertaining to e.g. national security (such as lists of critical sites) is different. I fail to see what this has to do with freedom of speech. As others have pointed out before me, a great deal of the information recently provided by WikiLeaks seems more or less trivial, old news etc. Much of it seems to be of more interest to parts of the media rather than the respective governments. Again, what do they hope to achieve with information which has nothing to do with whistleblowing?
Maybe the term whistleblowing isn't the exact (i admit my lack in english), but i don't come into the detail of single pieces. From the US point of view, it is of course a bad thing. From my view, it is a) good for average people to read how politics are done beyond the journalistic speculation, b) the risk of leaking may serve to mitigate some completely ruthless political decisions, since the only thing that politicians are afraid of, is political cost. A politician who is afraid that his not so moral directives may one day leak to the public, will think it twice before doing it, c) it is something that enhances transparency and judgment of the politicians by the people. For example if pubblically a politician claims one position and in leaked documents appears doing the opposite, this is something good for the voters to know. I wish there had been a "euroleak" 1 year ago, since now it appears, that in EU summits Trichet and the Commission had warned our goverment about the deficit and also our current PM had been informed. The only one that hadn't been informed, was... the population, that went to vote thinking that the deficit was 6% (as the gov was saying) and that "there was a lot money" as the opposition (and current PM) was saying. Yes, apparently they pubblish pretty much everything, important or not, but i don't really care. I think it's good for transparency and for mitigating ruthless policies. Even the meaning of trivial may vary from person to person. In the Wikileaks for example, there were things about greek relations, which i considered trivial in the sense that i knew about them. But when i was saying these things to friends (or strangers), they were calling me "crazy", "biased", "paranoid", etc. Now i simply show them the wikileak and say "see? I told you". This is priceless. :D As for the motives of Mr. Assange, i don't know. They could be honourable or they could be more selfish, like getting famous. I simply don't care as long as the content he releases is not fake. And if we judge from the reactions, it's not. The US does declassify documents after many years (about 30 i think more or less), but only some and in those there are censored parts, which usually are also the most interesting. It would be great to have them uncensored. Wikileaks has the advantage of releasing contemporary documents. I am sure the US gov will take measures to increase safety for at least the confidential files, but in meantime, i enjoy wikileaks for as long as it lasts.

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13 years 1 month

Posts: 9,689

From my view.....it is something that enhances transparency and judgment of the politicians by the people.
I couldn’t agree more; after all Assange isn’t making this stuff up!

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19 years 10 months

Posts: 2,886

Ask yourself which of those countries has, over the past decade or so, developed a taste for imprisoning foreign nationals who are accused of no crime within their civil jurisdiction (without necessarily bothering overmuch with minor details like due process) and I suspect that you'll have your answer. I, for one, wish it were otherwise, but there you go....
Hells Bells GA! I really had forgotten about that........to my shame I might add. I seem to remember the Soviet Union frequently being lambasted by the west for doing similar things. I have always said that during the Cold War, the antics of both sides were the same, it was just the badges worn by the perpetrators that were different. My very best wishes to Mr. Assange in his attempts to stay a free man, and to avoid becoming yet another sacrifice on the altar of "Homeland Security"

Member for

16 years

Posts: 4,674

The more I look at this affair, the more I think it's a false flag operation. The "leaks" serve the purpose of U.S. foreign policy just wonderfully. It's too good to be true. And nothing that is really damaging. And it's also the perfect virtual Reichstagsbrand that can be used to clamp down on the internet. Fishy. Very fishy.

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19 years 10 months

Posts: 2,886

And it's also the perfect virtual Reichstagsbrand that can be used to clamp down on the internet. Fishy. Very fishy.
Oh thank God I'm not alone!

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10 years 1 month

Posts: 4,956

Hah! Conspiracy theorists alive and well, as always on this forum!:)

Member for

19 years 10 months

Posts: 2,886

Hah! Conspiracy theorists alive and well, as always on this forum!:)
As I've said on an earlier post, I don't believe in conspiracy theories and I look at this situation as it stands. I know people who believe in all that 'secret one world Government' 'Illuminati' etc, and thats their privilege, but personally I don't. Its well known that the internet is a constant cause of concern for governments the world over, heaven forbid that the ordinary people in the streets should be able to talk to one another and share any information without their involvement or consent. WikiLeaks and others like it are just an illustration, albeit involving relatively low grade material, of the scale of activity that can go on via this medium. I've no doubt we'll see more of this in the future. If thats being a conspiracy theorist, then I guess I'll have to live with it.;)

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10 years 1 month

Posts: 4,956

My comment was directed at Distiller's post and your endorsement of it. I am not sure that that is entirely looking at the situation as it stands. As it stands a member or members of the US military have supplied a group of individuals with thousands of confidential documents, which the group has chosen to make public. Quite separately the leader of the group is wanted in Sweden on unrelated allegations. That, as I understand it, is the situation as it stands., but please correct me if my summary is wrong.