The British Are Coming!

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Well, sort of: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-17944376
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Judging by the two oversize people at the end of the clip he same result could be achieved by waddling against it with their stomachs.
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Paul178. I agree, with your comments. Slightly off thread. but why, do nearly ALL the houses in Canada and the USA, built of wood?. Looking at the raging forest fires in and around Colorado, most of the houses being burned down are made of wood.Why are they not made from bricks?. This seems to happen every year in C.A. also, again, mainly houses made of wood. Jim. Lincoln .7
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Jim The answer is wood is cheap in the USA and Canada. I have a friend in Arkansas who build a 6 bed house for $45,000. On the down side Arkansas is Tornado alley and he lost a house to one in 40 years! I bought an inch wide by eight feet a couple of weeks ago that was £4! I dread to think what building a 6 bed house would cost over here. Still a brick house ravaged by fire is going to be pretty much a write off anyway. On a lighter note despite it being the 2i6th aniversary of the declaration of independance tomorrow I don't consider Americans grown up enough to play with matches!:)
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Paul 178 Ahh, that explains why the Ozone layer is getting holes in it, less trees :rolleyes: Thanks America. :) Jim. Lincoln .7

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It's because bricks are too expensive, in America, while wood is plentiful, and cheap. When I visited the U.S., in 1985, the family, that I stayed with, told me that, back then, bricks cost a dollar each, so Lord knows what they cost today.

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The materials use in house building in the States, tends to vary with the area they are built in, although timber seems to be the most popular. It is interesting to see the different techniques used out there too. I used to be a big fan of "This Old House". A programme they have tried unsuccessfully to emulate over here. http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/tv/current-house-project/webcam/0,,,00.html
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Obviously Alan you did not mean 'This Old House' by Shakin Stevens Obvviously Alan you did not mean 'This Old House' by Shakin Stevens.:D http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln7m_1Om8Js But in the case of many of the 'low quality' (huge volume in reality) (easily shaken) structures in the USA 'Shaky's' song is quite apt.:rolleyes: Tank or no tank a JCB equivalent will have to be used for the debris or many manual wheel barrow loads will have to be hauled away unless without anyone looking they torch the entire street (UK rioters and looters style) - to the horror of the 'greenies' ofcourse;)
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Timber houses would be ideal in the UK right now. At least when it floods our houses will float. Would probably look like Trafalgar all over again. Maybe this weather is the result of climate change experiments by the US Government to convince the UK to buy their lumber. Maybe get back some of the money they spent on our old Harriers. It could be a massive conspiracy. Where the hell is "Passing By" when you need him??? :D lol.

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I don’t think anybody ‘got’ why I said the British are coming? ;)
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Probably not :D Mind you, my next reply is better off in my head, where it belongs :D

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Hi I do believe we used to get a lot of our timber from Canada and North America, until various government changes at some point in the past decided to import timber from scandinavia and the baltics (around 80% of it which is rather bad quick grown softwood). Only 15% is now imported from Europe and North America, the rest is from other areas such as the UK. I've replaced many a door frame in houses only 40 years old and the stud walls behind still have CANADA stamped on them and they look as new as the day they went in, all this softwood we get now is really not worth the money they charge for it. I was in a new £350,000 new build 7 bedroom house a few years ago and the amount of movement around doors and stairs in such a short space of time since completion was terrible, I could fit my finger between the wall and stringer on the staircase, and load of nails had popped their head on the plasterboard due to the house settling, that was a timber built brick faced house. Bought skirting a few months ago, put it in the room it was going to be installed for two days, it warped like a banana completely unusable I think it tried to return to its original tree trunk shape. :cool:
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I don’t think anybody ‘got’ why I said the British are coming? ;)
I think I did ;) Brmmm, brmmmm....