Interesting News Snippets

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How do you send the pizza back if it's wrong :)

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8 years 8 months

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Post it marked 'collect'' !

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The interesting news snippet is that there appears to be no interesting news coming from that far away land of which we know so little.

I refer to our sister column - Historic Aviation. The news is that there appears to be a continuum of no news of what some regard as the less than realistic appearence of a spectral vision of a magnificent invention by an engineer and aviation designer; R. J. Mitchell Esq.

If the writer of this article refers in circumspect terms to this engineering masterpiece which, for the moment must remain nameless, it is out of respect for hundreds of enthusiasts who have contributed their knowledge and enthusiasm to an oft times romantic but persevering quest for what some experts have referred to as an 'aviation Holy Grail'.

Climate change supporters have mooted that the current experience of an extended monsoon season, might suggest that the monsoon will continue without break from year to year, thus limiting for the forseeable future any further attempts at archaeological incursions. Others - metaphorically spitting fire, are dismissive of such a notion, asserting that it is almost written in concrete that the aberrant weather now prevalent in that far away country of which we know so little is purely temporary.

Either way, the absence of news has created a rancorous hiatus in the flow of information. Those experts who are engaged in the preparation of lengthy and informative reports some, intended to stimulate book and TV deals are, no doubt twiddling their thumbs while quietly suffering the cold pangs of anxiety.

I say to them; "Hang on in there, your time will come". If I have to leave Rangoon Towers, my stately pile on the banks of the Showaddy River, to extract news however miniscule, then I will do that even if it means spitting not tacks but fire.

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A newspaper article refers to comments made by esteemed author and historian James Holland regarding the publicity accorded to British and American military efforts on D-Day, 6th June, 1944.

Mr. Holland writes that the British, who bore the brunt (numbers and equipment) of the D-Day landings have been ignored and the glamourous Americans whose landings were almost a gallant failure, have cornered the publicity mainly on account of the numbers of reporters and cameramen who accompanied their forces.

The British developed the plan for the invasion. They invented and built the Mulberry Harbours. Thery landed - with the Canadians - more troops, flew more sorties with more aircraft and were responsible for providing two thirds of the warships, transports and assault craft carrying the invasion troops.

However, like the Germans, the Americans had the better uniforms !

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A report by the Royal United Services Institute concerning the cost of Britain's wars since the fall of the Berlin Wall reveals that Mr. Blairs wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have cost £29 billion. Bruce, with your appreciation for Mr. Blairs 'cleverness' , this news may not appeal to you.

In addition, the results were strategic failures. Terrorism spread and about 100,000 Iraqis died as a consequence. The RUSI go on to comment that British soldiers were part of an American led coalition, so were unable to influence strategy.

Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Britain has spent around 35 billion on its various wars.

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8 years 8 months

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My newspaper 'speaks'. Nigel has done it again. 'It' in this connection means headline grabbing with all that that means for increasing UKIP support and taking support from the Tories.

He has announced that he proposes to reduce the top rate of tax from 45 to 40% and to place a grammar school in very major city in England and Wales. possibly Scotland too if they are still around.

If he goes on like this he'll be sounding more like a Tory than a Tory used to sound like.

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8 years 8 months

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As Bill Sleaze, ace reporter for the Daily Globe would write, a thought provoking article has appeared in the D.Tel concerning nutritional methods of treating some cancers.

I've often wondered why it is that we chuck cows milk down our throats with a degree of abandonment. Cows milk is surely meant for calves and not humans. Ditto all dairy products says he who worships at the shrine of Cheddar and especially those pasteurized effusions from Normandy.

The report concerns a woman, a scientist working at Imperial College who contracted cancer some many years ago and who was advised to avoid all products related to and originating from what is referred to as dairy. She received conventional cancer therapy concomitant with her change of diet and eventually found herself free from this life threatening disease.

Her anti dairy diet lapsed and she found that the cancer returned. Again, it disappeared after she had been on her exclusion diet for some time and she has remained free from concer.

I realise that one swallow does not a summer make and it would make interesting reading to analyise any statistical evidence that has arisen in support of this particular nutrional therapy.

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7 years 2 months

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With any luck it'll be about 10 years before it's proved - if it ever is, so I think I'll take my chances with milk on my cereal, cream on my strawberries and delectable fromages francais from time to time.;)

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Rugby fans. My paper mentions that England play New Zealand on Saturday, 7th June. Can't find any details - as usual - about start time and which channel is showing it. Pessimism tells me Sky.

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7 years 2 months

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'fraid so. 0835 on Sky Sports!! Might be on Radio 5 Sport perhaps, but I rarely listen to their coverage.

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Thanks Charlie. Could mean an early trip up to No.1 son who subscribes. Don't like to make it too often - he might suggest sharing the cost of the subscription.

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I am 99% certain the other two Tests also kick off same time on the 14th and 21st. So looks like you could be doing just that!!

Pssst, anyone looking? - look at this......http://www.wiziwig.tv/competition.php?&part=sports&discipline=rugby&archive=no&allowedDays=7

Look at the second item. The link doesn't always work but put it this way I have seen a fair bit of Aviva Premiership this season as well as some Top 14 ....and quite a bit of cricket......ssshhh!

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Tried it and it works !! Fingers crossed for Sat. Looks like I might owe you a pint or ten.

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Delighted. Enjoy the match. I am away so will miss it but as we will be below strength thanks to the vagaries of the IRB's scheduling I am more interested in the next two tests where at least one win is not beyond the bounds of probability. And that would set up the home match in November nicely.

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All my favourite and not so favourite newspapers have something to write about with regard to Birmingham, education and Moslems.

I'm not too sure what all the fuss is about. I was educated at a number of faith schools (Catholic) as were my Protestant and Jewish friends at their faith schools. No one paid any attention. We were each educated in the values and ideals of our respective faiths which, in some cases, differed markedly from each other.

I don't think that we came to any great harm as a consequence of our different training. We played together, made friends and religeous differences were not high or indeed, anywhere on our list of priorities.

Perhaps there are serious concerns about which the general public are unaware.

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We're in an age where religion is increasingly taking a back seat, so of course people find it alarming when their children are being exposed to hardline religious practices.

I hope this is the start of a process that will result in all schools being secular by law. The indoctrination of children into any religion, whether at home or at school, is highly immoral IMO.

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Two lads interviewed at the same time in the same school,
Lad 1 [a muslim ] stated that they weren't allowed to mix with females at the school, Lad 2 then says yes but thats wrong it's an academy NOT a faith school --so they ARE imposing their ways.

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I don't think stroking "faith" schools with such a broad brush is helpful. I have some experience of both C of E as well as Catholic Primary schools and the last aspect of them which would occur to me was that they were doctrinal. Religion seemed to be gently dealt wirh and certainly lessons embraced other faiths in a general sense. I am not sure that a Muslim school is so liberally minded, is it?

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It is still a good and workable idea to segregate boys from girls during education. When I was young it was commonplace. Co-educational ideas began with the left wing take over in the 60s.

Educate boys alongside girls and they become more interested in each other rather than learning to read and write - with the now so predictable consequences.

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. Co-educational ideas began with the left wing take over in the 60s..

No, they didn't; from 1945 to 1951, I was taught in classes that comprised boys and girls; at the 11-plus boys and girls, who passed, were sent to separate schools, while those who remained behind stayed in mixed classes until they left school.
Educate boys alongside girls and they become more interested in each other rather than learning to read and write - with the now so predictable consequences

Not until puberty sets in; prior to that they largely hate each other.