Archbishop of Canterbury: there is no god!

Profile picture for user snafu

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 2,748

...Is something he didn't quite say, but it was not far off:
“The other day I was praying over something as I was running and I ended up saying to God ‘Look this is all very well but isn’t it about time you did something – if you’re there’ – which is probably not what the Archbishop of Canterbury should say.” http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/11102371/Archbishop-of-Canterbury-my-doubts-about-existence-of-God.html
Now, all we need is for the pope to admit his doubts...;o)
Original post

Member for

8 years 6 months

Posts: 6,467

......and for you to give us all a break......
Profile picture for user snafu

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 2,748

Oh, hello again. Thought you were ignoring me. How about, for a change, you actually address the subject rather than float in, issue my dismissal like some sort of all conquering fuhrer whilst trying to drag the topic off subject, then smugly retire as though you had nothing to do with it?
Profile picture for user j_jza80

Member for

8 years 6 months

Posts: 1,540

It's something he didn't say at all. Doubting your beliefs occasionally, and reaffirming them is a sign of intelligence. I would be concerned if he didn't question his faith occasionally. I actually respect the way the Church is managing its decline respectfully.
Profile picture for user snafu

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 2,748

I actually respect the way the Church is managing its decline respectfully.
Indeed, but whilst the silent minority/majority (delete as per your own belief as to which is correct) of those actually on the 'front line' of the church - the ones working with the public every day - might doubt their belief, the official word from the top has always been more toward an all-knowing, all-seeing deity who is infallible. About three years ago I had the fortune to talk with a vicar who had been in Rwanda in the immediate aftermath of the genocide of 1994. He had been - in his own words - utterly traumatised by the savagery that had taken place and could not understand how the two sides could do such things to each other, nor why his god could allow it to happen. He had some medical training and was present, assisting the humanitarian aid group Doctors Without Borders, at a massacre in a refugee camp in spring 1995 where he witnessed thousands killed by the Rwandan army while the few UN troops present could do nothing; on his return he suffered a PTSD breakdown (as did General Dallaire, the Canadian commander of the UN mission in Rwanda throughout the genocide, who fought with his superiors in New York about trying to prevent the slaughter beforehand and with them when they wanted to withdraw UN forces from protecting enclaves of Tutsi, hospitals and other humanitarian sites; little wonder he subsequently tried to commit suicide...) which was prolonged by frequent visits from superiors all eager to underline the idea that his belief should be stronger after having witnessed such scenes! Apparently when others suffer similar doubts if they cannot be returned to the right path then yet want to carry on doing the church's work ("after all", he told me, "you can lie about what you personally believe, and no one knows unless you tell them!") they are 'shamed' (his words) into silence with the plea that the church needs to present a strong public face - which was what happened to him. So when someone that high up the religious food chain, like the archbishop, makes this sort of admission - even if just in jest - it must show that some logical thinking over belief has been accepted. Of course, how the African churches react will be the real test...

Member for

11 years 9 months

Posts: 2,248

......and for you to give us all a break......
Which neatly illustrates the attitude you have to any views which do not idolise your own. It contrasts rather interestingly with much of the responses to your ahem "thoughts," which whilst they may not agree with your position do generally set out a solid reasoned factual explanation of why that might be. Anyhow, so the chiefy archy bloke (or is it blokeess these days? don't really keep up to date with the dealngs of the fairy worshippers, but do understand that females are now allowed to become chiefs, how progressive!) has almost stated that they have doubts re their faith? From small acorns and all that.