Telling your kids the facts of life.

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Got a feeling my 7 year old son will soon start asking those awkward questions, and hoping someone might be kind enough to share their experience or advice. In particular, how to avoid making it all seem somehow shameful or embarrassing but still "private" (for want of a better term) Still cringe when I recall what I innocently said to my Mum after my Dad told me. :eek: Thanks in advance for any advice.
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7 years

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7?!! Blimey times have changed - childhood innocence will be non-existent in another generation.
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Yeah, I know what you mean, Charlie. Think I was about 13, lol. Seven or eight seems to be considered the "right" age nowadays, though.
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My grandson is 11 and is getting "vaguely curious" but football, cars, aircraft and soldiery are really what matter at the moment.

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I agree that 7yrs old is a bit young. I'd have a word with his school first.
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Without in anyway impugning the actions of the OP surely that is part of the problem. Insidiously schools have subverted the role of the parents in so much of a child's upbringing. Or perhaps in many cases parents have been more than happy to devolve their responsibilities to schools. I am sure none of the parties benefit from it.

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Re 6 Took my reply 'out of my mouth' ! Creosote. You're Dad. Your responsibility.
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I agree 7 seems a bit young, but I sometimes sense he's getting ready to ask. Certainly won't be rushing him into it, but want to be ready just in case. So, any tips?

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Don't anticipate, but wait for the question, then answer it simply and truthfully, and don't elaborate. Children can take a lot, but not lies, or being evasive; you might well find that he's getting (duff) information from the class know-all, and your response could just get "Oh, can I go out and play football, now?" I remember talking to my godson, when he was 11, and his unhappy response "My dad won't talk to me about it."

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Look on amazon, there are a number of "me and my body" type books that will when the time comes help to make the discussion easier.

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Sex education for me started at school and involved a broom handle, a condom stretched to enormous proportions and a very graphic (not to mention colourful) film of child birth. My parents didn't mention such things.
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Sex education for me started at school and involved a broom handle, a condom stretched to enormous proportions and a very graphic (not to mention colourful) film of child birth. My parents didn't mention such things.
Your school was clearly determined to give most of the pupils an inferiority complex!!:D
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Just to say thanks for the replies, folks. Some good advice which is much appreciated.