Jaguar To Build Another 9 XKSS

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http://edition.cnn.com/2016/03/24/autos/new-york-auto-show-jaguar-xkss/

Now if only we can convince Jaguar to build limited edition Spitfire and Lancasters and from their Castle Bromwich site ?

Were any damaged during production where gaps in C/N exist ?

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Were any damaged during production where gaps in C/N exist ?

Why would that be necessary? There are still plenty of Tesco bags full of corroded, mangled shards of aluminium dug from muddy fields in existence, in order to to give identities and legitimacy to newly-build airframes.
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Hear hear! However I did assume Post #1 was tongue-in-cheek...

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Hi All,
While I love the idea of these continuation builds at the same time I can't help thinking they are just cash cows and making money on the rarity of whatever vehicle they will produce, even possibly reducing the whatever original rare vehicles value or am I being to cynical ?

Geoff.

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http://edition.cnn.com/2016/03/24/autos/new-york-auto-show-jaguar-xkss/

Now if only we can convince Jaguar to build limited edition Spitfire and Lancasters and from their Castle Bromwich site ?

Were any damaged during production where gaps in C/N exist ?

Funny how Jaguar keep finding unused blocks of chassis numbers - the programme about the run of Lightweight E types was shown again recently . I seem to remember that one or two experten were slightly sniffy about the new builds

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More Mk3 Spitfires please, so sick of the others, I have a data plate for one

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Profile picture for user Sabrejet

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Hi All,
While I love the idea of these continuation builds at the same time I can't help thinking they are just cash cows and making money on the rarity of whatever vehicle they will produce, even possibly reducing the whatever original rare vehicles value or am I being to cynical ?

Geoff.

It doesn't seem to work that way: there are plenty of GTO 'toolroom' copies but prices for originals and replicas keeps rising. Ditto pontoon-fender Testa Rossas and Aston DB4GT Zagatos.

What Jaguar is doing in nothing new and gives us a chance of seeing (in the case of the E-Type Lightweights rather than the XKSS) period-correct cars racing in anger, where the originals are becoming too risky to race. More power to their elbow I say.

Last week's Goodwood Member's Meeting contained a great many cars "...of various provenance" as commentator Marcus Pye nicely put it. I doubt many noticed.

Difficult to see where Jaguar would go now though: XJ13 maybe?

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Hi All,
Sabrejet,
Like I wrote it is nice but and if as you say it does not affect the original survivor cars value then keep at it, one problem with that I just wondered would there then be a glut of them if customers asked for more or would they be regarded as the next generation and accepted for that ?

What about a nice modern 24v Dolomite Sprint always the Dolomites the smell in my 1850 was lovely it was like wearing a sofa every time I drove it.....:D

Geoff.

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Who will buy these, and will they be driven?

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Why is this thread in 'Historic Aviation'?

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Funny how Jaguar keep finding unused blocks of chassis numbers - the programme about the run of Lightweight E types was shown again recently . I seem to remember that one or two experten were slightly sniffy about the new builds

While the last lot were genuinely 'unallocated' Lightweight E-type chassis numbers, I'm not sure how they can find similar numbers for the XKSS. The XKSS was created out of a D-type to sell unused obsolete racing cars, so each one has a D-type chassis number (XKD xxx) which was then replaced with an XKSS chassis number on conversion (XKSS xxx). There wasn't really any that didn't get used as a result - you'd just be making up random numbers.

From what I hear they plan to use the numbers of those that got destroyed in the factory fire - but then that ringing isn't it?

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Why is this thread in 'Historic Aviation'?

http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii120/Duggy009/a%20and%20a%20two/XKSS-wallpaper.jpg
:eagerness:
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There is a market for quality replicas, some D types go for 200-300,000...to say nothing of the exact Pur Sang Bugattis and Alfas.
And the recent 2004-6 Ford GTs are bucking the typical supercar trend and are bringing double their original price.

The lesson seems to be even guys who can afford a very expensive car lust after rare originals that even they can't afford.

BTW, I saw a real XK-SS cross an auction block in Arizona in 2003, it was bid to just under $1 million...but didn't sell, the owner wanted more.

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http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/ii120/Duggy009/a%20and%20a%20two/XKSS-wallpaper.jpg
:eagerness:

I see they had to put the Jaguar on a mat, guess it was puking more oil than the radial behind it...........

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Why is this thread in 'Historic Aviation'?

Car (auto) and aircraft technology often run in parallel paths: in the case of the D-Type/XKSS it was probably the first race car to employ aluminium monocoque construction (though I know there was the Issigonis Special prior to that), so it has a great deal in common with aircraft of the 40s/50s.

Recent carbon fibre construction methods again began in the race car world with CanAm in the '60's and on that occasion it took aerospace a while to catch up. Use of titanium again was echoed in race cars (CanAm again), and there are many 'wings and wheels' type events which deliberately cater for the phenomena of car enthusiasts also being interested in aviation.

Graham Warner, Spencer Flack and many others raced cars and operated historic aircraft.

Aside from that, many historic aircraft engines survive and run, only because they are fitted in race cars: I'm thinking of the unique Sunbeam Maori, various WW1-era aero-engined specials etc. There is even a FIAT-based monster which races with an Isotta-Fraschini airship engine.

So (for me, as one with interests in both camps), perfectly appropriate here.

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[QUOTE=Sabrejet;2302765 Graham Warner, Spencer Flack and many others raced cars and operated historic aircraft. [/QUOTE]

I once saw Stephen Grey at Duxford riding a bike. How about a thread on the Raleigh Wayfarer?

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Ref appropriateness of the thread. Malcolm Sayer was the major aerodynamasist and stylist/designer at Jaguar, he learnt his trade at Bristol Aeroplanes.

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]244842[/ATTACH]

A green Jag in front of a plane? Here's my daily driver in front of XR713 a few weeks ago. Last of Malcolm Sayer's designs :)

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Jags

The car I really lusted after was the E-Type coupe, but it cost $500 more than the roadster, more than I could afford on the pay of a 2LT, so a roadster was what I ended up with in '67, one of the last covered-headlight roadsters - factory new with 12 miles on the odometer when I picked it up in Coventry. The budget was so tight I had to settle for painted wire wheels instead of the chrome wheels, but it came with much improved radial tires.
The frustrating part was driving back to base in Germany with the rpm limitations imposed by the break-in
period of the 4.2 engine which limited top speed to around 60 mph - on roads with no speed limits.
After the break-in period, I'd cruise at around 125 mph. Above 130, the front end got awfully light ... nothing on the road was faster, the
only competition came from the occasional Porsche 911S or Ferrari. I did own a coupe years later, one I bought for $1000 with a slipping clutch.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]244844[/ATTACH]

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Hi All,
Talking of Jaguar e-types I love this shot two of the best of British designs IMHO............:eagerness:
More info on this very car at this web site:- http://www.jaguarheritage.com/t/othercars_022
https://www.jaguarheritage.com/Content/Images/uploaded/TheCollection/Other%20vehicles/1970%20E-type%20S3%20WHP205J%20archive%20shot%20with%20Jaguar%20aircraft.jpg
1970 E-type S3 2+2 with Jaguar aircraft.
Geoff.

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The Series 3 E-Type 2+2 are painful to look at...far too bulbous, the car equivalent of a side by side Vampire.
The V-12 didn't do the handling any favors, the exposed headlamps and larger air intake along with the stretched cabin turned a lithe design into a round mess.

Another great example of keeping designs around too long.

Having said that, inexplicably they're increasing in value along with the rest of the range.
An acquaintance bought one, a nice car with no major faults, several years ago for nothing and now it's becoming a shrewd investment.