What Book Are You Reading?

Read the forum code of contact

Member for

23 years 1 month

Posts: 1,389

As of right now not quite finished yet but reading Finding the Few.

Really enjoying it. Thanks Andy.

Now finished it. Must get my own copy as I had a friends copy.

Need to read some of Andy's other book now. Fantastic read.

Member for

14 years 9 months

Posts: 5,339

'Memoirs of a Fruitcake' by Chris Evans.

Member for

16 years 4 months

Posts: 9,735

‘Stalingrad’ by Antony Beevor (not a good read if you’re trying to save money on your central heating this winter), ‘Tank Men’ by Robert Kershaw and ‘Stolen Journey’ by Oliver Philpot (the ‘Wooden Horse’ POW escape by one of the escapers)...

...which I’ve lost somewhere! :rolleyes:

Member for

18 years 3 months

Posts: 9,731

For some reason, this time of year I get great pleasure selecting a different Putnam book on UK manufactuers to thumb through before bed.
I go out of my way to reread chapters on their earlier or lesser known efforts.

Three down: AVRO, HP and Vickers...
Bristol tonight! :)

Fairey, Hawker, HP, Shorts, Supermarine, Westland, DH, etc...before Christmas!

Member for

11 years 6 months

Posts: 212

I would support New Forest with his endorsement of Lee Childs.

I have recently read one of his books after it had been leant to me by a friend. I wasn't particularly looking forward to reading it, not really liking crime thriller type books but I was hooked from page 1 and can't wait to get round to reading another of his books.

IE

Member for

11 years 4 months

Posts: 3

""Wind beneath my wings", by John Huchinson, Concorde pilot.
Xmas pressie from my daughter in NZ via Amazon. honest and well written.

This has nothing to do with aviation, but if any members have children, I recommended it :

Future-proof Your Child: Parenting the Wired Generation [Paperback]
Nikki Bush (Author), Graeme Codrington (Author)

Publisher: Penguin Global (August 12, 2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0143025805
ISBN-13: 978-0143025801

Member for

17 years 5 months

Posts: 1,376

Just finished Bill Bryson's "The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid" about growing up in Des Moines, Iowa, in the Fifties. Loved it.

Member for

14 years 9 months

Posts: 47

New year reading

I am in the middle of reading Max Hastings new work "All hell let loose: the world at war" on my kindle, I am a bit disappointed however I dont think it is anywhere near as good as his other world war 2 books "Armageddon" or "Nemesis" which I personally thought was excellent.

Member for

23 years 1 month

Posts: 6,968

Not long finisheshed 11.22.63 by Stephen King. I enjoyed it, seems to have found his form again. I've usually got several books on the go at once so at the moment it's The Real Tenko and The Coolie Generals by Mark Felton, Dead Men Risen about the Welsh Guards in Afghanistan and from t'internet I'm reading the odd bit of Kipling.

Regards,

kev35

Member for

17 years 5 months

Posts: 1,376

I say, Do you like Kipling? ;)

Member for

17 years 9 months

Posts: 8,839

Kipling Cakes? Please send some. :)

As of right now not quite finished yet but reading Finding the Few.

Really enjoying it. Thanks Andy.

Now finished it. Must get my own copy as I had a friends copy.

Need to read some of Andy's other book now. Fantastic read.

Why, thank you!

Cheque in the post......:D

Member for

13 years 8 months

Posts: 556

Alex Henshaw's "sigh from a Merlin". Almost through it,, i was hoping for more technical observations of the different marks he flew. Most of his incidents with the Spifires he tested are a little more than quick mentions. Not as in depth as i hoped, i wonder if Jeffrey Quills book has better technical content,,,

Member for

11 years

Posts: 68

Just finished reading "Yeadon above the rest" charting the history of Yeadon Airport (now Leeds Bradford Airport) It covers the history from pre ww2 air field through WW2 when it served as a air strip for the Avro factory nearby (Ansons, Lancasters, Yorks) all the way until today. Which is now a busy airport.
But the clues are there if you know where to look.
A very interesting book, even if your not local.

Member for

11 years 9 months

Posts: 1,542

I've just finished Vulcan 607, which I thought was fantastic :cool:

It reads like a Clive Cussler novel, but obviously anchored in real events. It gives you a great insight into the mammoth task they had and that the Vulcan and Victor were still fantastic platforms 30 years after their conception, carrying out tasks they weren't designed to do.

Member for

11 years 6 months

Posts: 212

I read Vulcan 607 a couple of years ago, and agree that it is an excellent read.

I'm not really into historic or military aviation, but still thoroughly enjoyed the book. As j_jaza says, it reads like an excellent thriller, and the fact that it is true makes reading the book not just a very enjoyable experience, but a humbling one too, especially as you read about all of the air to air refuellings and you realise just how finely tuned the whole operation was.

At totally the other end of the scale, I have just read Dear Air 2000 by Terry Ravenscroft. In the book, Ravenscroft engages in an often surreal, sometimes funny but always inventive correspondence with a number of major airlines.

If you have got a Kindle you can get it free from Amazon - I'm not sure that I would want to buy it, but if you can get it for free it is well worth downloading, as it will provide the occasional chuckle and you will marvel at how cleverly Ravenscroft keeps the dialogue going when the airlines try to end the correspondence.

Member for

11 years 3 months

Posts: 1

What book are you reading?

I am reading Stranger in a Strange Land and it is a great book written by Robert A. Heinlein and i loved it.

Member for

16 years 5 months

Posts: 985

Just finishing At Home by Bill Bryson. Fascinating stuff and well worth a read.