What Book Are You Reading?

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Member for

24 years 3 months

Posts: 6,968

J G Ballard's Empire of the Sun.

Regards,

kev35

Member for

15 years 9 months

Posts: 135

Area 51 by Annie Jacobsen...lots of very interesting revelations, particularly
about XB-70 and SR -71 Blackbird

Member for

12 years 3 months

Posts: 112

Seven Pillars of Wisdom. T.E Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia).

Member for

16 years 3 months

Posts: 1,813

Just starting British Aviation: Widening horizons 1930 - 1934 Harald Penrose.

Planemike

Member for

24 years 3 months

Posts: 16,832

This is a good one!

Remember Under An English Heaven, the first-rate novel about the 8th Airforce and its impact on the people of a Suffolk village?

Well the author, Robert Radcliffe, has recently launched Dambuster

He uses the device of a fictional crew within 617 Squadron and an Intelligence Officer at Scampton (A badly burned Wellington pilot) to weave a novel around the time of the formation of the squadron, the raid and its immediate aftermath.

From all I read it is historically very accurate - a contrast to the Brickhill book.

I devoured it in three sittings - totally enjoyable.

Heaven still stands out as his best work, but Dambuster is a good excuse to turn off the tele.

Moggy

Member for

14 years 3 months

Posts: 1,259

Some vintage sci fi with Doc E.E. Smith's First Lensman

Member for

24 years 3 months

Posts: 6,968

Just finished A Guest of Nippon by Eddie Hunn and started Tattered Remnants by Eric Burgoyne.

Regards,

kev35

Member for

20 years 2 months

Posts: 1,751

Murder

I've just finished Flightpath To Murder (Death of a Pilot Officer) by Steve Darlow, the story of Bill Maloney who crash landed his Tempest and walked away unscathed only to be murdered by the local police and government officials.

Member for

20 years 8 months

Posts: 18,353

This is a good one!

Remember Under An English Heaven, the first-rate novel about the 8th Airforce and its impact on the people of a Suffolk village?

Well the author, Robert Radcliffe, has recently launched Dambuster

He uses the device of a fictional crew within 617 Squadron and an Intelligence Officer at Scampton (A badly burned Wellington pilot) to weave a novel around the time of the formation of the squadron, the raid and its immediate aftermath.

From all I read it is historically very accurate - a contrast to the Brickhill book.

I devoured it in three sittings - totally enjoyable.

Heaven still stands out as his best work, but Dambuster is a good excuse to turn off the tele.

Moggy

I'm sure I saw that in the local library the other day - it looked quite intriguing. I may well pick it up now.

Member for

13 years 10 months

Posts: 8,306

A huge book of JANES Fighting Aircraft of WW1. Must admit, looking more than reading, only got it today.
Jim.

Lincoln .7

"Sapper Dorothy"....the story of Dorothy Lawrence who served as a Sapper in the REs for ten days during WW1. She was a journalist who snuck into the lines disguised as a 'Tommy', and although the story is well documented there is just something about it that doesn't sit true.....

Member for

12 years 3 months

Posts: 112

This is a good one!

Remember Under An English Heaven, the first-rate novel about the 8th Airforce and its impact on the people of a Suffolk village?

Well the author, Robert Radcliffe, has recently launched Dambuster

He uses the device of a fictional crew within 617 Squadron and an Intelligence Officer at Scampton (A badly burned Wellington pilot) to weave a novel around the time of the formation of the squadron, the raid and its immediate aftermath.

From all I read it is historically very accurate - a contrast to the Brickhill book.

I devoured it in three sittings - totally enjoyable.

Heaven still stands out as his best work, but Dambuster is a good excuse to turn off the tele.

Moggy

So much incredible stuff has been written, about events that have actually happened, and are real, I prefer it to reading something that someone has made up.
But whatever floats your boat, so to speak.

Member for

24 years 3 months

Posts: 16,832

Yeah. Stuff that people just "make up" is rubbish.

That's literature written off. Let's diss music next huh?

Moggy

Member for

20 years

Posts: 784

Propellorhead by Antony Woodward

He thought it would be a good idea to take up flying to attract the other sex:D:D

Member for

20 years 8 months

Posts: 18,353

Propellorhead by Antony Woodward

He thought it would be a good idea to take up flying to attract the other sex:D:D

That's a good read. Read it some years back.

Member for

12 years 3 months

Posts: 112

Yeah. Stuff that people just "make up" is rubbish.

That's literature written off. Let's diss music next huh?

Moggy

Ooh, touchy!

Member for

13 years

Posts: 6,535

If you thought that you knew all about it - well there's more ! This is griping stuff and very easy to read. 800 pages of "The Battle of Britain" by James Holland. Published by Corgi: £8.99. ISBN: 978-o-552-15610-3.

Wonderful account full of pics that I hadn't before seen.

John Green

Member for

15 years 2 months

Posts: 110

Battlecruiser by Douglas Reeman.

Member for

12 years 7 months

Posts: 226

"Red Eagles: America's secret MIGs". Very good read.

Member for

16 years 8 months

Posts: 2,820

I'm reading the Osprey book on Iranian F-4 operations, it makes fantastic reading and is a great companion for the F-14 book in the same series. At the time of the Iraq-Iran war, I don't recall it being covered heavily in the news (Ok, before 24 x 7 news channels) and the perception was almost along the lines of, if those two are at each others throats, all the better for everybody else.

Some of the F-4 operations were amazing, roaming over the Iraqi capital almost at will, with the west seemingly thinking that complex operations were beyond the Iranians, many of whom were executed, tortured or imprisoned by the new regime.