What Book Are You Reading?

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Member for

18 years 10 months

Posts: 4,472

This certainly shows and the novel is, by all accounts, appalling. I will finish it because I never let a book defeat me, but I will never be touching Dickens again.

Part of our national heritage? Perhaps in a socio-historical sense, yes, but as a literary work, not by any stretch of the imagination. :mad:

I have read oliver twist and another novel I remember, and I loved them both... I haven't read the book you mention though.

Nic

Member for

14 years 2 months

Posts: 1,259

From Tailhooker to Mudmover by Dick Lord, a nice combination of his career flying with the RN and the second part covers an exchange with the US navy, not got that far yet. Peppered with anecdotes of incidents and high jinks. Very enjoyable so far.

Member for

11 years 7 months

Posts: 702

Just finished McKinstry's book on the Hurricane - best of his three aeroplane books I think.

Just started The American Civil War by John Keegan.

The one hundred years war of the secret societies by Henry Coston

Interesting reading material :)

Member for

13 years 9 months

Posts: 8,306

"Bomber Command" issued 1941, by HMSO.
Picked it up for £1.00. whilst on holiday, very good insight as to what, where and when raids took place over Germany.
I understand there are similar books, issued by HMSO, possibly Coastal Command.
Anyone know?.
Jim.
Lincoln .7

Member for

18 years 7 months

Posts: 1,376

Yes Jim, there are several in that HMSO series. Will PM you.

Member for

16 years 8 months

Posts: 42

Wings of the Luftwaffe and others

Currently I have the pleasure of reading:

Wings of the Luftwaffe: Flying German aircraft of the Second World War (Eric Melrose Brown)

[INDENT]According to Wikipedia, Brown have flown more types of aircraft than anyone else in history. In this book he 'reviews' - among others - the Fw200C, Heinkel He162, Junkers Ju87, Dornier Do217, Messerschmitt Me262, Bf109G and Bf110. (Must have been like being a child in a candy store, albeit a dangerous candy store from time to time?)[/INDENT]

Gunner: An illustrated history of World War II aircraft turrets and gun positions (Donald Nijboer)

[INDENT]With lots of wonderful pictures by photographer Dan Patterson[/INDENT]

On the bedside table I have:

[INDENT]The Secret Years: Flight Testing at Boscombe Down 1939-1945 (Tim Mason)
Contrails over the Mojave: The golden age of jet flight testing at Edwards Air Force Base ( George J. Marrett)
Dogfight: The greatest air duels of world war II (Tony Holmes)
Bandits over Baghdad: Personal stories of flying the F-117 over Iraq (Warren E. Thompson) [/INDENT]

A good thing about the time of year we are approaching is the 'need' to commence indoor activities :cool:

Member for

11 years 6 months

Posts: 2

Just finished 'Eminent Churchillians' by Andrew Roberts. (Splendid hatchet job, rightfully so, on Mountbatten). Highly recommended

Started on 'Dancing in the Glory of Monsters' by Jason K Stearns. It covers the Great War of Africa and the collapse of the Congo.

As an aside, I bought a copy of 'The Last Englishman' by Lt Col A.D. Wintle. Utterly fabulous book. I paid ten quid for it from a second-hand booksearch facility in Braintree 14 yrs ago. Amazon have 3 copies for sale in average to good condition. £350, £370, £395. Whooaahh !!

Member for

20 years 8 months

Posts: 18,353

Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched The World by Vicki Myron.

Detailing the life of a rescued orange tabby cat who helped change an Iowa township, it's a great read, heartfelt and genuinely funny. If you're a cat owner, you'll definitely dig this book.

Member for

11 years 10 months

Posts: 151

The 50th anniversary edition of Pathfinder Cranswick.

Member for

18 years 7 months

Posts: 1,376

"A Postillion Struck by Lightning" First volume in Dirk Bogarde's autobiography.

Member for

11 years 6 months

Posts: 11,141

Currently re-reading "Piece of Cake" but this year have read, amongst others, the two Hilary Mantell books - "Wolf Hall" and "Bring up the Bodies". Brilliant and unputdownable, if you enjoy historical novels.

Member for

18 years 7 months

Posts: 1,376

"Starman" a biography of Yuri Gagarin. Didn't realise that unlike the early NASA astronauts he was not a test pilot but just an "ordinary" fighter pilot on a MiG-15 squadron when selected for the cosmonaut training program. Soloed on the day I was born.

Looks like a good book to read :)

Member for

11 years 6 months

Posts: 11,141

Devices and Desires - P D James. I always read 3 or 4 of hers every year - my favourite crime fiction writer. Plot, character and above all the writing are matchless.

Member for

15 years 8 months

Posts: 135

A book by Nelson DeMille entitled "the Panther" is a book I have not read. However, I am number 28 on the wait list at the local library and am eagerly awaiting becoming number 1. His books are always well worth waiting for. "Nightfall" about TWA Flight 800, being my favourite thus far.....

Member for

16 years 8 months

Posts: 1,404

`Me Cheeta` The autobiography.................the chimp from the Tarzan movies...seriously.

Member for

11 years 6 months

Posts: 11,141

I wholly endorse Zigzag - incredible story.

Member for

20 years 5 months

Posts: 2,778

The best book I've read in the last twelve months is this...

http://www.gasolinegypsy.co.uk/

Peggy Iris Thomas rode around Canada, the United States and Mexico on her 125cc BSA Bantam in 1951.
Peggy, an ex-WW2 WREN took her dog Matelot along too, for the ride. He rode in a box on the back.
Peggy was the genuine article. This isn't one of those travel books where the author didn't leave West London.
Indomitably cheerful and resourceful, she was brilliant.

A.