What Book Are You Reading?

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Member for

12 years 10 months

Posts: 50

My holiday reading for my aborted holiday to the Costa-del-Manchester-Airport was "Blitz" by MJ Gaskin.

I put down the book cover-side up on the table next to me when the waiter brought our drinks......... and it wasn't until he spoke I realised he was German :o:o don't mention the war :o

Member for

17 years 7 months

Posts: 8,839

Just finished 'Chinook' by David McMullon, couldn't put it down. The author describes his involvement with SAS deployments, the Falklands, Ireland, the Gulf War and Lockerbie. You are in the helicopter with him at all times and it gives you a close insight into the workings of the RAF.

Member for

19 years 7 months

Posts: 12,842

Just finished 'Chinook' by David McMullon, couldn't put it down.

Just push the collective forward and slightly ease back on the throttle :D;)

Member for

14 years 7 months

Posts: 5,339

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Member for

12 years 10 months

Posts: 1,683

Neville Duke -Test Pilot and his War Diaries. Having mislaid my original copy of his book I managed to pick an original hardback up for a quid, in excellent condition, so it's like having an old friend back in the house.

Member for

17 years 3 months

Posts: 1,376

Shame to let this thread die. I'm currently reading a supposed biography of WWII Spitfire pilot "Barney" Barnfather by Angus Mansfield. Bit of an odd, cobbled-together feel to it, because apart from a page or two about the subject's upbringing and entry into the RAF, there's very little actually about him. Lots of quotes from ORB's of the units he was with, diary entries from comrades, and the occasional single line from Barnfather's log book, but (so far) almost nothing really about the man himself. :confused:

Member for

13 years 2 months

Posts: 379

The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien :D

Member for

19 years 4 months

Posts: 8,505

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Heavy stuff but a good read all the same.

Member for

19 years 4 months

Posts: 8,505

Fiction:- Death Force by Matt Lynn and Team Yankee by Harold Coyle
Non fiction:- Under The Wire.
Yes I'm weird. I always have at least 2 books on the go at any one time. Usually I have one fiction and one non fiction, that way I have something else if I am not in the mood for a particular book.

Member for

17 years 1 month

Posts: 495

Currently making my way thru the history of early SF and am now reading Master of the World by Jules Verne-his last novel from 1904

Member for

13 years 2 months

Posts: 4,956

Just finished Bletchley Park and am re-reading First Light after many years before plunging into my next Henning Mankell Wallender story.

Member for

13 years 8 months

Posts: 21

"A boy who loved airplanes" which is the autobiography of...

"DONN A. BYRNES, the son of a career U.S. Army doctor and his wife, was born on 29 May 1931. After many moves about this country, a short stay in Hawaii, and attendance in eighteen different schools, Donn graduated from Edison High School, San Antonio, Texas, in 1949. He enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in 1951 at age nineteen after three and a half semesters of pre-med at the University of Texas.
Progressing from PFC aircraft mechanic to Aviation Cadet and Air Force pilot, he flew F-84s and F-86Ds in the U.S., Japan, and Guam. In 1958 he and his family returned to the U.S. to attend an Air Force Institute of Technology-sponsored program in electrical engineering at the University of Texas, Austin.

Returning with BSEE in hand to Wright Field, Wright-Patterson AFB near Dayton, Ohio, in 1962, he negotiated an assignment to Project 665A (Reconnaissance/Strike). Unknowingly he had hit upon one of the seed programs for the SR-71 sensors. It was as sensor and systems integration engineer at Wright Field that Donn met Ken Hurley and, in early 1964, was briefed into the SR-71 program.

Absorbed by the Blackbird development effort, Captain Byrnes was transferred to Edwards AFB, California in July 1964, where he became the SR-71 Sensor Test Engineer and Flight Test Engineer. He left Edwards in 1968 to become Base Commander at Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. Returning to the U.S. in 1969 he was reassigned to the SR-71 Program, and almost immediately transferred to the F-15 Program, where he was Airframe Projects Manager, Deputy Chief Engineer and, finally, Director of Projects. In 1975 Donn left the F-15 System Program Office (SPO) and assumed the job of Director of Engineering at the Air Force Contract Management Division, Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Colonel Byrnes retired in November 1978 after accumulating more than 3,200 pilot hours, most of which was single engine jet time."

He has written books on both the SR-71 and F-15 development, both excellent reads. The autobiography is very good too.
For information see here..
http://www.sagemesa.com/store.php

Member for

22 years 11 months

Posts: 6,968

Knights of Bushido - A short history of Japanese war crimes.

The years the locusts have eaten.

Ghost Soldiers by Hampton Sides.

Unsung Heroes of the Royal Air Force (The Far East Prisoners of war.)

I see a bit of a theme here.

Next up are:

Forgotten Voices of Burma.

Reaping the Whirlwind - The Japanese and German experience of World War Two.

Am also thinking I need to have a good look at this - http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/PTO/IMTFE/index.html

regards,

kev35

Member for

15 years

Posts: 430

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

Member for

19 years 4 months

Posts: 18,349

Casper the Commuting Cat by Susan Finden.

Member for

14 years 7 months

Posts: 5,339

Frenchman's Creek by Daphne Du Maurier .

Member for

17 years 1 month

Posts: 760

The Lazarus Project by Alexsandar (yes, that is the way his name is spelt) Hemon

Member for

16 years 10 months

Posts: 2,814

"The Secret History" by Donna Tartt.

Member for

17 years 1 month

Posts: 495

Am next going to cast my eyes to Lieutenant Gulliver Jones: His Vacation
(Gulliver of Mars)

It being a novel from 1905 by Edwin Lester Arnold, lovingly prepared as an electronic-book by the good members of the MobileRead forums!
http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1285518550l/9267948.jpg

Member for

12 years 11 months

Posts: 58

The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.
( A trilogy in five parts )!!!
I remember the old TV series.
Cheers
Jeff
DONT PANIC.