Favourite TV programs

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10 years 6 months

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I'm a fan of quizzes so, Millionaire is high on my agenda.  I admit to being slightly mystified at the poor standard of general knowledge.

From where does mozzarella cheese come ?  One of four possible answers:  Goats, cows, sheep or buffalo,  The contestant chose goat and lost a few thou.  the correct answer was buffalo.

Which of these locations is in Essex ?  Eastbourne, Northampton, Bristol, Westcliff-on-Sea?  The contestant's phone- a-friend who hopefully knew the correct answer was the contestant's father who said he thought Eastbourne but, it was a guess.  The contestant thought the same and plumped for Eastbourne in Essex.  Result' he lost a few thousand.

These samples are not extreme and should be easily within the grasp of most.  Why are they not ?  Does anyone know?  Can anyone guess?  Does anyone care? 

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Member for

8 years 10 months

Posts: 1,198

John, I feel ashamed. I must admit to not knowing that mozzarella comes from buffalo. However, I do know that Westcliff-on-Sea is in Essex but only because I know that the other three choices are not. Have I heard of Westcliff-on-Sea? No. Yet I wouldn't say I have a poor standard of general knowledge (well, I wouldn't would I?) just from those examples.

I assume though that it is not just those 2 questions that have brought about a state of mourning over the loss of general knowledge and probably it's not just while watching "Millionaire" that you've noticed this. Why the lack of general knowledge nowadays? Why did there used to be more? Hobbies and pastimes, which would impart knowledge without you even realising how educational they were, played a big part - stamp collecting, model making, family quizzes, 20 questions, etc. For kids there were exciting things still happening to get passionate about. To want to learn more about. Learning is so much more fun when it isn't formal. Of course, there were no computers to instantly answer any questions so they had to be discovered in books or by asking someone "in the know" and, by having to work to get an answer, the information stuck.

Without going any further, John, I think "changed days" is the simple answer to your question.

My favourite TV program being screened at present is "Walking Britain's Lost Railways" on Channel 5. We even had a bonus this week as the latest episode was filmed on a line we have walked a few times. It was great to see a lot of historical footage and images of it in its heyday.

Member for

10 years 6 months

Posts: 6,527

Mm

Do you believe that reading is now a lost art and that is the principle factor? I occasionally visit my local library and seldom if ever see a child quietly reading or moving along the shelves to choose something interesting. I've never seen a young person reading a newspaper and that probably goes some way to agreeing with your summary of 'changed days'.

Strangely enough altho' most people struggle with quite ordinary general knowledge if the question concerns pop music, popular films, and the odd theatrical production that elicits a generally accurate reply.

Member for

8 years 10 months

Posts: 1,198

John, I was truly saddened one day when, while browsing a second-hand bookshop, I heard a conversation in which a very young girl was telling her father about a map she was looking at and how much she liked maps and could she have it please. The answer was scathing - no, she didn't need the map and anyway she could just use Google. "I don't like Googling everything" said the sad little voice of a child no more than 6 years old. What a lost opportunity to encourage a young child's interest in the world. The map was less than £3. Had daddy looked more approachable I'd have offered to buy it for her. Being in the bookshop he was obviously a reader himself so I found his attitude very surprising.

I'd agree that reading is a lost art and a huge factor. The internet has taken over and is there all the time with the answers. Those answers don't need to be retained in the memory banks because it is always there and it is instant. I think in a way that brings about a lack of interest in learning.

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1 year 3 months

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My recommendation: Undercover, a great show with some really incredible acting. Frank Lammers especially had some great moments, feel he may have studied Sopranos a bit because his mannerisms have a very Soprano-esque vibe to them.

Member for

10 years 6 months

Posts: 6,527

Any fans here of 'Bangers & Cash?' If you are into classic cars and m/cycles and general motoring memorabilia this is the program for you. It features a family run business of buyers, collectors and auctioneers located in Yorkshire. The - to me - colossal sums generated by the sales of some of the more desirable vehicles leaves me astonished.

Don't chuck that Mini Clubman out even tho' it resembles it bit of lace, it could be worth 20k.

Member for

10 years 6 months

Posts: 6,527

Delicious addition to the quiz item.  A repeat of an almost legendary showing of  'Millionaire was featured on TV yesterday, Tuesday. 

Chris Tarrant: "Which of these four words is used to describe an archbishop or high ranking bishop:  Carnivore, Rodent, Primate, Marsupial ?"

Contestant:  After much deliberation and teeth sucking:  "I don't think it is carnivore but, it could be rodent. It isn't Primate so, it must be Marsupial.  Yes, I'll go with Marsupial ".  

This is now number one in the Pantheon of all time bizarre answers.

Member for

10 years 6 months

Posts: 6,527

It might have been around for some time but, I've just found ForcesTV on Freeview.  It seems to be a program dedicated to all things military.   At first glance it looks pretty good !