Phew that was close.. pint anyone.?

Profile picture for user Wyvernfan

Member for

12 years

Posts: 5,805

A serious incident but the outcome made me smile.. for once the three back seaters faired better than the two up front; 4th June 1962 RAF Victor B.1A XH613 15 Sqdn, Cottesmore, all four engines failed at 2,000ft. Pilot ejected OK, Co-Pilot ejected OK, all 3 rear crew "bailed out". Crashed on final approach to Cottesmore following a generator failure [fuel supply failure] and all four engines failed at 2,000ft. The first three crew to bail out landed beside the "Ram Jam Inn" on the A1 where liquid sustenance was provided by the landlord. The two pilots ejected and landed some distance away, and upon reaching the same "hostelry" were told by the landlord that it was closed. The aircraft had in the meantime dived into the ground vertically and exploded. Taken from the superb Ejection-History website.
Original post

Member for

9 years 9 months

Posts: 1,683

As an occasional visitor to the hostelry mentioned in the late 60s I am sure there was a plaque or a framed description of the incident, but the memory is a bit hazy after 40 odd years. Your post certainly rang a few bells.
Profile picture for user Moggy C

Member for

19 years 10 months

Posts: 16,831

The Ram Jam was certainly a good roadhouse ten years back when I visited a few times. Never noticed the plaque though. Moggy
Profile picture for user Peter Clare

Member for

14 years 8 months

Posts: 88

A few more details on the above incident taken from 'Category Five' - Cummings Date given as 14 June 1962 14-June 1962 Victor B1A XH613 15 Sqn 5 miles north east of RAF Cottesmore Whilst approaching RAF Cottesmore at the end of the sortie, all four engines ran down because the electrical connectors became disconnected on the throttle box. The aircraft was being flown by the squadron commander's crew Wg Cdr J G Matthews, Co-Pilot - Fg Off W B Lowther, Navigator Plotter -Fit Lt G B Spencer, Navigator Radar - Fit Lt B H Stubbs, and Air Electronics Officer - Fit Lt E W Anstead. On the order to abandon the aircraft, it is believed that the rear crew left the aircraft in less than half a minute and, although one man left the rubber of his flying boots along the fuselage, the entire crew survived.

Member for

13 years 10 months

Posts: 1,171

A few more details on the above incident taken from 'Category Five' - Cummings all four engines ran down because the electrical connectors became disconnected on the throttle box.
Did the Victor have some sort of throttle by wire system? I imagined it was built in the days of push/pull rods and cables. Whats the Vulcan got. Richard