"Airshow" rather than "aeroshow"

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One of those thoughts that occurs whilst washing dishes.

When I go down to the aerodrome to watch the aeroplanes performing aerobatics for the enjoyment of the crowd, why is this not an aeroshow?

What is the etymology of airshow? Is it of US origin? The Flight Archive makes reference to a "Pan American Air Show" in 1919 but for European events at the time it prefers "Aero Salon" or "Aeronautical Exhibition".

cf airliner vs aeroliner

Yours curiously...

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Profile picture for user bazv

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Then again...if you went to the Airfield and watched the Aircraft.... :D

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Then again...if you went to the Airfield and watched the Aircraft.... :D

haha! Very good! :)

My enormous 1973 Shorter Oxford Dictionary does not even have an entry for airshow which is a pity as it has etymologies for "airship" and "airway". Bah!

dictionary.com claims that airshow originates from "1910 - 15" but with no reference to the original material.

One of life's little mysteries.

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Also an airshow or airdisplay is held in the air, aero as a word derives from the actual machines and thus the venue itself (sometimes).

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I think Airshow probably is an americanism !
Back when I were a lad I would probably have gone to an 'At Home day' or an 'Air Display'
or similar
Pageant was also used etc

Edit... 'Air day' was also used (I think)

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At Home Air Day

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Surely an 'At Home Day' was more specific to military open days, same as the old 'Batle of Britain Day' shows.
Air Day or Air Display covers the whole air show thing.

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Somebody say etymology? :) Reaching for my dictionary vol A-B i find it is probably also too old (1933) to be of much use.

However, it mentions the origin of 'Aeroplane' as far back as 1866 derived from the Greek meaning Air and Wandering (as in Planet). But the use of Plane is this context is acknowledged as being from the curved surface of the wing. Curiously in 1910 'Aeroplane' was also used as a verb - “bad thing to aeroplane on I should imagine”

'Aerodrome' literally means “running through the air” and is compared with hippodrome (horse racing stadium, not the theatre) - this explains Langley's use of the name for his first airplane. The earliest use of 'Aerodrome' was for both the course the aircraft flew around as for the ground upon which they started and finished. It could (maybe) be argued that aerodrome is the correct classic-origin word for airshow.

Oh, another aside, 'Aerodromics' - the art of constructing and using aeroplanes

'Aircraft' - originally meant a collection of flying machines - rarely a single example, although that is now more common. Hence “Aircraftsman - a man who manages aircraft, an aeronaut”.

'Airplane' first appeared in the Westmorland Gazette in 1907 referring to the “despair of the aeronauts in their air-planes” an early example cheerily mixing the classic origins with the modern English.

And that is probably where the terms derive - I think of Aeroplane as British and Airplane as American now, but they are likely to have emerged simultaneously as the new technology needed things to have names. Preferences develop over time.

And one more - 'Airline' in use since 1888, but of note Francis McLean in 1928 stated "it is difficult to see how public air-lines can compete with railways".

Interesting, but doesn't answer why. Anybody got an Oxford Dictionary supplement from the 1980s to add more?

AllanK

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Hi James
Yes of course but I wonder when 'Airshow' came into general use in the UK...?which is of course the OP 's question !

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[QUOTE=Pondskater;1634339]

And that is probably where the terms derive - I think of Aeroplane as British and Airplane as American now, but they are likely to have emerged simultaneously as the new technology needed things to have names. Preferences develop over time.

AllanK[/QUOT

There was an article in the Aeroplane (or was it Flight?) back in the 1950s which explained why "Airplane" was incorrect usage. Pity I can't remember the reason now!
Jim

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There was also the 'Empire Air Day' held in the 1930s.

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I prefer fête aérienne - but then I would, wouldn't I!

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'Punch' was using 'Air Show' in the 50's for Farnborough ;)

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'Punch' was using 'Air Show' in the 50's for Farnborough ;)

SBAC Farnborough is an interesting one because Air Show is the only way I've ever heard it called, but it might be a generalism?
Where as SBAC Radlett (http://vodpod.com/watch/4104142-radlett-1947-air-display) was called Air Display.

The St Mawgan shows were called International Air Day officially, but this was at the cease of the BoB open days, early 1970s

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Sorry was being a little too subtle i think
'Air Show' possibly would be the English version of the American 'Airshow' ...if you see what I mean

cheers baz

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Sorry was being a little too subtle...if you see what I mean

I do now (he says winking very subtly back!)

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Now I'm wondering whether I'm using words such as aerodrome in an accurate manner!

It seems that as with many new developments in English there were no clear "rules" as to which prefix was "correct" or which was appropriate.

Upon reflection I do remember some aero words in other languages: Aerolineas Argentinas, l'aéroport. I wonder if Spanish and French were more orderly than English in their invention of such words.

Thanks for all the feedback, even if it makes me question myself :-)

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Then again...if you went to the Airfield and watched the Aircraft.... :D

Or the aerodrome to watch aeroplanes :)
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Or the aerodrome to watch aeroplanes :)

Post number 1 refers ;)

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There we are, another French word - aérodrome - which my dictionary defines as aerodrome, airfield and (am) airdrome!

I seem to recollect that, before the last war, the various terms had more specific meanings. An airport was a licensed flying field that received scheduled air services. An aerodrome was a licensed flying field predominantly used by club flyers. A landing ground, which was not necessarily licensed, was a place at which a lady or a gentleman, flying to another town for lunch or the weekend, could land her or his flying machine but, perhaps, was not a place habitually used for landings and and taking offs and did not have aeroplane sheds (note - hangar is another French word!) for the storage thereof when not in use. A flying field was similar but, it seems, was one which saw more frequent aerial activity and might have had a clubhouse and aeroplane sheds. Furthermore I think that I am correct in saying that a flying field did not have marked runways and the ladies and gentlemen using the same would take off and land into wind regardless of where, in the 360º available to them, that would place their landing or take off run.

I wonder if there are any flying fields extant today, i.e. a field whose grass is cut in its entirety to allow landings and take offs in any direction and which enjoys unobstructed approaches and departures in a 360º radius? I believe that it was industrial action by the Amalgamated Union of Aerodrome Grass Control Operatives, just after the last war, that effectively sounded the death knell for the traditional flying field. I seem to remember that they issued an ultimatum to aerodrome operators that, with the introduction of the 40 hour working week, there was time enough only to cut two or three 100' wide strips through the grass but that they weren't going to do the whole b****y field unless there was guaranteed overtime !

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Sounds good AA,but is it as organized as that ?I have worked on many Airfields (or Bases !!) but only 1 Aerodrome...Dunsfold :)
It must be an aerodrome - cos it says so on the signpost !!
For some reason Dunsfold has been known as an aerodrome as far back as I remember and yet it was not built until 1943 (+ military)
I always regarded aerodrome as a pre ww2 term (obviously french) and meaning the same as airfield .
I also was under the impression that 'Hangar' was merely french for 'Shed'- our early a/c hangars tended to be called 'Shed' as well...I have worked in the 'Flight Shed' on an 'aerodrome' :)

It would make sense if an 'Airport' had been the term for an airfield being used for international travel though !!