B-29 Superfortresses used over Europe in WW2

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Here some information which some may not be aware of... B-29s were flown to England in 1994 and in 1945 conducted bombing raids over France. How interesting even i didnt know they did European WW2 ops.. http://www.network54.com/Forum/149674/message/1323588592/Project+Ruby+-+a+single+B-29+bombed+sub+pens+in+Germany+in+1945 Phil
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Very interesting! It would be good to see a copy of the LW recon image mentioned in the text and what the Germans made of the presense of the B-29 in Britain. "RAF 24,000 Big Tom bomb"?
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[ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","data-attachmentid":3854928}[/ATTACH][ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","data-attachmentid":3854929}[/ATTACH] Some doubts 1 The Hobo Queen made its UK landfall at St Mawgan, Cornwall, UK 2 I doubt the story about it flying over France 3 Summer 1945 is after the end of WWII in Europe....Is the sub-pen bombing correct? I thought the next B-29 in Europe was 1946 (correction it was October 1945)
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The visit of the B-29 to the UK has been covered in detail (it did make its landfall at St Mawgan) in a recent thread here, and it's possible psychological/propaganda effects on German air command. Haven't heard of the raid though.
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You can read up on the Hobo Queens visit on http://www.rafwatton.info/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=S7i%2B60gxfv0%3D&tabid=90&mid=417 and the visit was discussed here previously http://forum.keypublishing.com/showthread.php?t=80484&page=2 and http://forum.keypublishing.com/showthread.php?t=40981 photo onpost#15 Again serious doubts about the details in post #1 this thread but it's just struck me how long it stayed in the UK (nearly 4 weeks)

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Interesting, but no info on what the Germans themselves thought of the B-29 in Europe? Still puzzled by "24,000 Big Tom bomb". Grand Slam was 22,000 lb and I doubt the YB-29's bomb bay was big enough to carry one.

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The Germans expected B-29s to be introduced, and this drove their requirements for high altitude fighters - Ta152, Bv155 and Ju388J. I understand that the visit of a single B-29 to the UK was used for propaganda purposes - presumably this implied leaking this information to the Germans through the Doublecross system. Postwar trials were carried out with heavy UK bombs, but these were carried underwing because the B-29's bombbay was split into two. Unless good evidence is produced, I have to say that this story of a wartime raid does not seem plausible. That's being polite.
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The first press reports of a B-29 coming to England was in October 1945. Reported in the Aeroplane Spotter on 18 Oct 45
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I've seen nothing on B-29 combat in Europe....anywhere. It didn't happen. In all probablity, The Hobo Queen...or any B-29 in the UK in March 1944, was not combat ready. In January 1944, General Arnaold said he wanted 175 B-29s combat ready by the first of March. By March first, they weren't ready. Arnold told a general to do whatever was necessary to get the planes ready for deployment to China. (Remember the B-29 was the world's first "super-bomber"...pressurized with new and complex engines and armament systems. It was vastly more complex than any other bomber). The B-29s were already built, but they were awaiting the latest updats and modifications at USAAF-run modification ceners in Kansas, and adjecent to the Bell Marietta (Georgia) and Martin Omaha (Nebraska) B-29 plants. There were many technical issues involving the engines, fire control system and the fuselage pressurization sealing....not to mention a lack of specialty parts and tools and mechanics not being familiar with the new aircraft. Also, severe winter weather in Kansas and Nebraska, hampered the modification process which was done outdoors. Boeing sent engineers and production personnel from Seattle to help with the work, and after six weeks, (March 10-April 15) the modification bottlenecks were overcome and the early B-29 were combat ready. Obviously, newer B-29s would have the latest updates and improvments installed on the production line. So to recap...Any B-29 flying in March of 1944 was not ready for combat...and I doubt if the USAAF would have sent one on a mission...even a "milk run" to France, at that time. Aviatiion historian Peter M. Bowers, worked for Boeing as an engineer and was the leading authority on Boeing aircraft. In his book Boeing Aircraft since 1916, Putnam 1966, 1968, 1989, writes about China-bound B-29s being delivered via North Africa "...with one sent openly to Europe as a feint." Pg 323.
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Bovingdon visit of B-29 44-61679 October 1945 [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-attachmentid":"3631939","data-size":"full"}[/ATTACH] Deja vu
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Tallboy
Pretty sure a B29 couldn't carry a 22,000lb RAF bomb, not weight but size. Never heard of this solo raid, interesting Baz
They tested a B-29 with a couple of tallboys under the wings.
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According to Haynes Dambusters manual. B29s could be modified to carry Tallboys and Grandslams either recessed in the two section bomb bay or on inner wing pylons.

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I thought Operation Ruby was a test of Tall Boy and Grandslam on reinforced targets after the war was over?
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test
I thought Operation Ruby was a test of Tall Boy and Grandslam on reinforced targets after the war was over?
Tested on sub/pens near Kiel in 1946. I wonder if thats the mix up with dates?
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According to Haynes Dambusters manual. B29s could be modified to carry Tallboys and Grandslams either recessed in the two section bomb bay or on inner wing pylons.
Blimey, photos anyone?:eek:
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To quote Mr. Bowers again.... By the end of WW-II, some B-29s had the two bomb bays modified to a single unit to carry a single 22-ton bomb and others were modified to carry a single "Block Buster" under each wing between the inboard nacelles and the fuselage. Emphasis added. Sorry no photos. Looking around my library, there aren't a lot of good B-29 "nuts and bolts" book. I have some on operations, not much on the aircraft itself.
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Yes, posted up the last time we discussed this, but search not dragging up thread These two images from article here, http://forum.valka.cz/viewtopic.php/t/35123
Are the underwing bombs Tallboys or Blockbusters? It seems inconceivable to me that a B29 can carry the load of a Lancaster under each wing!
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"Toward the end of the war a B-29 had been converted to carry two 22,000-lb bombs, one under each wing, for use against Japan." The Extra-Super Blockbuster by Dr. William S. Coker Air University Review, March-April 1967
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I know little about bombs, just quickly posted a link and pics of what is usually described as B-29 carrying two Tall Boys (which they appear to be to my eyes), I must admit that I thought Blockbusters were 'cookies'? I don't struggle with the weight issue as the B-29 is quoted as being able to lift 22,000Ibs, but the positioning so far aft on the wings surprises me. Re op Ruby, Wiki says this, "Beginning in March 1946, Project Ruby was a joint, Anglo–American project to investigate the use of penetration bombs against heavily–protected, concrete targets. The target selected was the Valentin submarine pens, that had been rendered unusable and abandoned since 617 Squadron's attack on 27 March 1945. Grand Slams were carried by Lancasters from No. 15 Squadron RAF and US Boeing B-29 Superfortress. Around 140 sorties were flown, testing a range of different bombs."
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[I]"Toward the end of the war a B-29 had been converted to carry two 22,000-lb bombs, one under each wing, for use against Japan."
Now I'm surprised, a B-29 carrying not two 12,000Ib Tallboys, but two 22,000Ib Grand Slams, nearly double the types specified weapon weight capacity. Or has someone got confused with the bomb types?