Airco DH6

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 83

Here's a couple of rather poor pics of the SAAF museum remains. Currently displayed in a glass case along with parts of a later homebuilt type. Reflections off the glass make photography a tad hard! These were taken about a year ago. The fin and rudder, long aileron on left and wing structure, and fabric on the wall are the DH6 remains. Don't think there are other bits in store - though may be wrong. The wing structure seems smaller than what appears to have been found according to the news paper cutting on the display case. [ATTACH=CONFIG]23[ATTACH=CONFIG]233089[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]233090[/ATTACH]3088[/ATTACH]

Attachments

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 83

In the pics above, the metal elevator and fuselage frame and struts all belong to a 1930's homebuilt - an Erasmus NA 40, which was a Heath Parasol derivative - and are not DH6!

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 83

Meant to add - I think it's a great type to reproduce, and good luck with the project!

Member for

9 years 4 months

Posts: 1,101

Here's a couple of rather poor pics of the SAAF museum remains. Currently displayed in a glass case along with parts of a later homebuilt type. Reflections off the glass make photography a tad hard! These were taken about a year ago. The fin and rudder, long aileron on left and wing structure, and fabric on the wall are the DH6 remains. Don't think there are other bits in store - though may be wrong. The wing structure seems smaller than what appears to have been found according to the news paper cutting on the display case. [ATTACH=CONFIG]23[ATTACH=CONFIG]233089[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]233090[/ATTACH]3088[/ATTACH]

I have seen photo's of the fin, rudder, tailplane, elevators, & wings, that were taken outside of the museum building, there were also a couple showing the remains of longerons etc in the shipping container, these parts were not taken out at the time due to being all stuck together with the bags of tar "or whatever it was".

Bob T.

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 83

I will ask them if there is more - I should get an opportunity to drop by there in the not too distant future! There's also a large collection of Boxkite parts in the adjacent cabinet.

Member for

5 years 7 months

Posts: 9

Thanks for your input tony.......you must never say never or can't be done with these projects , I never met my grandfather but he was one of the first ever australian pilots deployed to Iraq in 1915... It would be a great tribute

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 83

He would have flown over my grandfather there - S Battery, RHA.

Member for

5 years 7 months

Posts: 9

Lots of the allies died after a huge bungle and siege of Kut I believe . If you were taken by the Arabs you would be killed . After a forced landing (caudron g3) my grand father was forced marched for hundreds of km .....ended the war being kept in an underground dungeon for 3 months ....flew after the war in the dh6 until early thirties ...btw learned to fly with
Bleriot!!!...hope your grandfather did ok

Member for

5 years 7 months

Posts: 9

Dh6 research project

That's definitely a Dh6 fin and rudder in the pix...have to make further enquiries. Some of the sixes went to Greece ,some to Sweden or such. I found the engine but as yet I don't possess it . Still researching.....crashed Mooroopna Victoria 1932

Member for

12 years 1 month

Posts: 151

My friends boss has a DH6 propeller hanging up on the office wall. My great grand father, Arthur Maxfield, also served in Iraq during WW1.

Member for

14 years 5 months

Posts: 1,174

That's definitely a Dh6 fin and rudder in the pix...have to make further enquiries. Some of the sixes went to Greece ,some to Sweden or such. I found the engine but as yet I don't possess it . Still researching.....crashed Mooroopna Victoria 1932

My wife's grandfather flew DH6's in Sweden in the early 1920's for P.O. Flygkompani, his name was Ralph Park.

Richard

Member for

5 years 3 months

Posts: 3

DH-6 replica.

Having tried and failed to find a suitable fuselage/airframe for training purposes I started to wonder about building a replica fuselage for our Scout Group. Having been donated a mobile classroom as an air training room we now have less outdoor room, but suitable secure accomodation to build a non-weatherproof aircraft.

To feep it fairly simple, and to tie in with history, I'd like to try to recreate an Airco DH6 aircraft. These basic trainers were, so it seems, simply designed and one was the first aircraft to be owned by the Scouts just after WW1.

So, as someone new to all this, who would be the best people to ask about dimensional drawings and cockpit layout? I'd like to make it as accurate as possible.

Hello,
I'm not familiar with forums so I hope this works.I was sent a link to your discussion regarding the DH-6 replica.A few years ago I was thinking of building a WW1 replica to flying condition and decided upon a DH-6.(As a long time owner of a Tigermoth I wanted something similar)I know a number of people in the business and started compiling everything I could find technically on the aeroplane.I also visited the SAAF museum and was allowed access to the only known remains of a DH-6 which they hold.I think I have as much info as is available which is detailed in some places but lacking n others.I'd say there was enough for a good replica.I'm happy to share what I've found if it may be of use.......I'd be interested in anything you've turned up.
I've not abandoned the plan but another lead which is taking time has slowed things down.It's hard to know when you've found it all.
Good luck with it.If you think I can help let me know.Clive.

Member for

11 years 2 months

Posts: 1,539

Welcome to the forum Clive, I am presuming from your post that you are in South Africa. Have you still got your Tiger Moth?

Member for

5 years 3 months

Posts: 3

DH-6

Welcome to the forum Clive, I am presuming from your post that you are in South Africa. Have you still got your Tiger Moth?

Hello,
No,not in S.Africa..........the less exotic S.E.London.I was there working on a DC-3 and the owner was a good friend of the Museum.He arranged access to the DH-6 parts when he heard of my interest.It was an amazing coincidence to get a job there at just the right time.I still have my Tiger on a strip in Herts.
I'm chasing,with little success,a lead on more DH-6 parts here in the UK.It's an odd situation and the people involved are reluctant to do much to assist.They are convinced the parts are from a Bristol Fighter but I know they are not.A long story.
Do you have an interest in the DH-6?Clive.

Profile picture for user Sabrejet

Member for

10 years 2 months

Posts: 1,740

Clive,

Interesting to see your interest in this long-forgotten (but not much missed I suspect) type.

Did you ever look into the longitudinal instability of the DH.6? There's an interesting RAE report in the National Archives which shows that some modifications were tested, and proven to reduce the effects (short-chord rudder/elevators + wing back-stagger). These were included into later production machines and can be verified by photographic evidence.

The 'Clutching Hand' nickname was also going to be addressed by installing a bungee on the control column to reduce stick forces on pull-out. However other changes suggested to overcome the inherent centre of pressure problems by moving the lower mainplane aft and as an interim, increasing tailplane area, I suspect were never instigated. There is a reference in the report to the type's tendency to roll inverted in a dive, and this is also borne out by looking at accident data for the DH.6. Thus I'd have thought on the one hand that these recommendations would be implemented fully; on the other hand, by the time that the RAE report had been issued (October 1918), the type was rapidly being withdrawn from RAF use.

Since there is scant detail on whether these later changes were actually made (rather than drawn/documented, with the intention of making them), I'd appreciate your thoughts.

Member for

11 years 2 months

Posts: 1,539

Hello Clive,
Yes I am interested in all WW1 aircraft, toyed with the idea of a replica Pup at one stage but didn't do anything further than toying, I'm afraid, lack of space, time etc, the usual things. Perhaps one day. Good that you've still got the Tiger, I was getting checked out on one last year and thoroughly enjoyed it. Good luck with the quest re the DH-6 parts.
Have you got a brother who is into aircraft by chance?

Hello,
No,not in S.Africa..........the less exotic S.E.London.I was there working on a DC-3 and the owner was a good friend of the Museum.He arranged access to the DH-6 parts when he heard of my interest.It was an amazing coincidence to get a job there at just the right time.I still have my Tiger on a strip in Herts.
I'm chasing,with little success,a lead on more DH-6 parts here in the UK.It's an odd situation and the people involved are reluctant to do much to assist.They are convinced the parts are from a Bristol Fighter but I know they are not.A long story.
Do you have an interest in the DH-6?Clive.

Member for

5 years 3 months

Posts: 3

DH-6

Hello Clive,
Yes I am interested in all WW1 aircraft, toyed with the idea of a replica Pup at one stage but didn't do anything further than toying, I'm afraid, lack of space, time etc, the usual things. Perhaps one day. Good that you've still got the Tiger, I was getting checked out on one last year and thoroughly enjoyed it. Good luck with the quest re the DH-6 parts.
Have you got a brother who is into aircraft by chance?

Hi Sopwith and sabrejet,
Being a complete technophobe can you tell me how I reply without including the quotes?

So far this forum is the most i've found in one place regards the DH-6 interest.I really think it's an ideal aeroplane for an accurate replica.It was the first to have a control layout that has subsequently become the standard,first to carry the 'G-' prefix and an ancestor of the whole Dh line.Not as exotic as some but worthy of being remembered.
Whilst being essentially simple there were an enormous number of combinations tried regarding the wings.All degrees of stagger,drooping leading edges to straight,a number of aerofolis,several engines and 2 or 4 bladed props.The motor simply sits on the two extended upper longerons.What appealed were the constant chord ribs in the wings for simplicity.The tips are just blanked ribs.
What fascinated me having a close look at the SAAF parts was just how 'Tigermoth' it is.The basic woodwork is a simplified version (if that's possible??) and the hinge pintles,horns , bellcranks and drag wires are the same.Exactly the same.So,the -6 wasn't advanced....rather the Tiger is basically a WW1 aeroplane.
Also ahead of it's time is the control system.The drawings I've found (originals) show the control box and again it is identical to the Tiger including the rudder bars.It has an amazing cam system to disengage the rear controls should the instructor feel it necessary......
I will continue to pursue the other parts I've been tracking down here because if they are -6 it would really be a major find as regards construction.
Finally,in aswer to sabrejets question ,yes,my Brother is also in the business.Thanks for the interest.Clive.

Member for

9 years 4 months

Posts: 1,101

Hi Sopwith and sabrejet,
Being a complete technophobe can you tell me how I reply without including the quotes?

So far this forum is the most i've found in one place regards the DH-6 interest.I really think it's an ideal aeroplane for an accurate replica.It was the first to have a control layout that has subsequently become the standard,first to carry the 'G-' prefix and an ancestor of the whole Dh line.Not as exotic as some but worthy of being remembered.
Whilst being essentially simple there were an enormous number of combinations tried regarding the wings.All degrees of stagger,drooping leading edges to straight,a number of aerofolis,several engines and 2 or 4 bladed props.The motor simply sits on the two extended upper longerons.What appealed were the constant chord ribs in the wings for simplicity.The tips are just blanked ribs.
What fascinated me having a close look at the SAAF parts was just how 'Tigermoth' it is.The basic woodwork is a simplified version (if that's possible??) and the hinge pintles,horns , bellcranks and drag wires are the same.Exactly the same.So,the -6 wasn't advanced....rather the Tiger is basically a WW1 aeroplane.
Also ahead of it's time is the control system.The drawings I've found (originals) show the control box and again it is identical to the Tiger including the rudder bars.It has an amazing cam system to disengage the rear controls should the instructor feel it necessary......
I will continue to pursue the other parts I've been tracking down here because if they are -6 it would really be a major find as regards construction.
Finally,in aswer to sabrejets question ,yes,my Brother is also in the business.Thanks for the interest.Clive.

Hi Clive

Whilst you were at the museum in SA, did they show you the DH6 bits that were in the old shipping container as well as those that are on display ?.

The DH6 was one of several types that I looked into making a repro of, before settling on the Snipe. Lack of drawings was the main reason that I decided against it.
If you are serious about having a go at building an accurate repro of the DH6, you might find it helpful to acquire a photocopy of the parts manual for it & also the ones for the DH4/DH9 etc, to see which parts are the same, as drawings for the American built DH-4 are available.

I tried contacting a number of people in Spain regarding any surviving drawings from the ones that were built there, but didn't get any useful replies.

At a rough guess I would say that most of the metal fittings for the rear fuselage are the same "or at least the blanks would be", & the internal wing metal fittings as well as some of the control parts are probably the same.

Is the wing the one with the museum near Bristol ?.

I'd be interested in a copy of the control box drawings should you be willing to copy them.

Best of luck with your project.

Bob T.

Member for

5 years 7 months

Posts: 9

Yes ,it seems the line starts with be2 and somewhat continues through to the tigermoth . I am curious as to the parts call-up of the Be2 ,as maybe things like wing strut fittings may be available from TVAL in New Zealand. At one stage I had leads on Dh82 frames and considered a hybrid (tube fuselage) but they no longer exist