Channel Wrecks - Post Battle of Britain

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10 years 4 months

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Apologies if this has been discussed previously... I was reading about the Goodwin Sands Dornier at the weekend and it was facinating looking in hindsight at how well the Aircraft has been preserved over the years if you take into account the tides and salt of the Channel, a real survivor. It made me think i assume in the fifties/sixties a significant amount of Aircraft wrecks must have been discovered or washed up post Battle of Britain when you think of the extent of the Battle. My question is, what were the notable wrecks discovered that perhaps are now in museums or still within the depths? I also assume there were a number of wrecks that fisherman were aware of in the past that are now no more due to the salt and prevailing tides or have since dissapeared? Wondy
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Not far from the Dornier and in deeper water is a JU88 that is largely complete and which has been filmed by Bob Peacock. Pix on Youtube. Meanwhile the polytunnels at Cosford are empty !

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'Meanwhile the polytunnels at Cosford are empty ' -does that mean the citrus has stopped flowing or the aircraft has been moved elsewhere?

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I've always wondered If Bruce Lawless' Tempest 5 is still off the coast of Dover or is it Folkestone? This was the first instance of a Tempest being ditched successfully. Graham

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The Dornier fuselage cockpit and components have been taken into MBCC. Wing still in the wash.

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So now would be a good time to lift that P-38 off the Welsh coast before the weather gets worse, and before the Cosford tunnels get abandoned or dismantled? And given that it's the only P-38 in the UK....

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Graham, JN772 is off Dungeness, or to be more exact :- "HSL178 sighted an aircraft crashing into sea, position 110 degrees Dungeness 2 miles and recovered pilot uninjured. 22:10. AIR29/445" In essence everything that went into the Channel is still there in some form or other. In the same way that all other crashes on land, even those recovered at the time, have left fragments on the surface they struck even if it is just paint flakes. What pieces that are left on land and underwater is what was not recovered at the time/later and are being reduced to elements by chemical corrosion/reaction. For the more intact underwater and shoreline wreck to survive to present day requires a multitude of conditions to occur together and these usually only occur in a few localised areas off the UK coast. The better question is what could still survive in x and y areas. As an example look at the preservation state of fabric label on the Snorkel Parka from the Liberator, compared to the metal, in this special area of the Channel. http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/projects/marine/alsf/wrecks_seabed/round2rov/wa1001/b-24_wa1001_media.html Regards Ross
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10 years 4 months

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Graham, JN772 is off Dungeness, or to be more exact :- "HSL178 sighted an aircraft crashing into sea, position 110 degrees Dungeness 2 miles and recovered pilot uninjured. 22:10. AIR29/445" In essence everything that went into the Channel is still there in some form or other. In the same way that all other crashes on land, even those recovered at the time, have left fragments on the surface they struck even if it is just paint flakes. What pieces that are left on land and underwater is what was not recovered at the time/later and are being reduced to elements by chemical corrosion/reaction. For the more intact underwater and shoreline wreck to survive to present day requires a multitude of conditions to occur together and these usually only occur in a few localised areas off the UK coast. The better question is what could still survive in x and y areas. As an example look at the preservation state of fabric label on the Snorkel Parka from the Liberator, compared to the metal, in this special area of the Channel. http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/projects/marine/alsf/wrecks_seabed/round2rov/wa1001/b-24_wa1001_media.html Regards Ross
Hi Ross, Thank you for your post very interesting and informative! Wondy