Home needed for dH Drover

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5 years 10 months

Posts: 44

This might not be the right forum to put this on but i have in dry storage the Drover aircraft that was removed by Barry Parkhouse from an outdoor museum that closed a couple of years ago. I have to get rid of it by the end of February and wondered if anyone would like it. It is free to anyone that would like to take it otherwise i will have to scrap it which is the last thing i want to do. As i mentioned it has been dry stored and it looks as though everything is there from the day it was dismantled. It is not for the faint hearted but it could be assembled again for static display. I can assist in loading and it can all fit on one artic lorry. It is at St Athan near Cardiff Airport. To many other projects means that it has to go.

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Member for

11 years 11 months

Posts: 451

It NEVER flew in UK. It is so near Port Talbot!

Member for

15 years 11 months

Posts: 3,902

Scrap it !! - A unique survivor in the UK. I hope this suggestion is more to raise awareness than serious intent.

Be careful who you give it to, as there are people out there who will see it as just £1,500 of mixed metals;

DH museum is an obvious suggestion, though I am mindful they do not want to be everybody else's scrapyard, and the derelict Otter did not stay too long.

Photo at Booker.

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5 years 5 months

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I've sent you a private message

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10 years 9 months

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the derelict Otter did not stay too long.

Derelict Otters are usually rebuilt on a commercial basis, usually in US or Canada. Can't see the same thing happening for the Drover...

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10 years 8 months

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I would imagine that there's at least one preserved in Australia. Let it go.

Regards

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20 years 1 month

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The 'derelict' Otter was recovered from Deception Island thanks to the efforts of the British Antartic Survey. Having been there since the late 1960's -it was certainly vandalised but eminently restorable to make a very interesting display on the work of D.H designs in remote parts of the world. Disposing it whilst retaining a DH Comet replica made from box tube and sundry other components is questionable!

Regards the Drover -the obvious home is London Colney -its doesnt need scrapping - it doesnt need its front end chopping off ! It needs to go somewhere appropriate rather than a museum who wishes to acquire it because its the only one in the U.K and for no other reason!

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8 years 10 months

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Bit of background airframe history.

Built 1952 at Bankstown, Australia as a de Havilland of Australia DHA-3 Drover 1, with construction number 5014. The Drover was an 8-seat 'bush' airliner, powered by 3 x DH Gipsy Major 10 Mk.2. Essentially a very-much modified Dove in concept and design. Production numbered only 20 aircraft.

Over the years quoted as initially registered VH-EAZ then VH-EAS, vice versa, or more frequently just as solely VH-EAS, with the Internet and access to historical research post by eminent Australian researchers, the correct tale can be presented:

Initially registered VH-EAZ 30.7.52, and was delivered to QANTAS (also quoted as in July 1952). Was equipped as a Mk.1F and later upgraded to a Mk.2 by 1954. The Drover became VH-EAS, with a re-registration date of 18.8.54 (or 5.5.58 depending on info source), although still in service with Qantas.

Photo of VH-EAZ of Qantas as a Drover http://www.edcoatescollection.com/ac1/austcl/QantasFleet/VH-EAZ(2).html

Purchased by Air Navigation and Trading Ltd of Blackpool, UK, in December 1960 and registered G-APXX. Arrived at Liverpool Docks on September 19th 1961 and was delivered by road to Squires Gate Airport. Never assembled and lay dismantled, mostly in outdoor storage beside the AN&T hangar at Blackpool for a number of years.

Moved to Southend 19th May 1967 as an early exhibit for the British Historic Aircraft Museum and later Historic Aircraft Museum at Southend. Assembled and re-painted as 'VH-FDB' in typical '50s period 'Royal Flying Doctor Service' colours. Once HAM closed, entered in the 10th May 1983 auction, and sold for £1,700.

To the Warbirds of Great Britain collection, at Blackbushe c.1983.

Acquired by the Second Word War Aircraft Preservation Society Museum and moved to Lasham July 1985 and displayed by them outdoors until closed 2009. Retained the RFDS colours and 'VH-FDB' registration as applied by BHAM at Southend.

Dismantled by Barry Parkhouse and moved to his premises at Booker/Wycombe Air Park, by October 2010.

To St. Athan 5th August 2013 and stored inside.

(own notes, plus: Ken Ellis, 'British Museum Aircraft' 1977 & 'Lost Aviation Collections of Britain' 2011).

Member for

7 years 9 months

Posts: 352

I would imagine that there's at least one preserved in Australia. Let it go.

Regards


One safe assumption you can make about aircraft preservation is not to assume that 'someone somewhere else' will preserve a type. And in any case what is the issue with preserving an Australian aircraft in the UK? I would think it unlikely to head back down under.

I do not care what museum or collection may acquire the Drover as long as its restored well, cared for and kept under cover. A far better scenario that the present situation.

I really wasn't sure if this Drover was still around. I am happy to see that it is at least complete and has a chance of preservation.

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13 years 3 months

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The 'derelict' Otter was recovered from Deception Island thanks to the efforts of the British Antartic Survey. Having been there since the late 1960's -it was certainly vandalised but eminently restorable to make a very interesting display on the work of D.H designs in remote parts of the world. Disposing it whilst retaining a DH Comet replica made from box tube and sundry other components is questionable!

What became of the Otter Dave ?

Profile picture for user Bruce

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20 years 1 month

Posts: 8,426

My intention when I was at London Colney was to take the Drover, but I was over-ruled by the membership, who didn't want to take on another derelict airliner. That same attitude led to the Otter going - something I had worked on with David Burke. To be honest, looking back, they made the right decision in both cases; there are only so many people there, and only so much space. Neither aircraft would have been an easy shoe in.

Drop me a line if scrapping becomes an imperative. I can house it until there is a brighter future for it.

Bruce

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11 years 8 months

Posts: 652

It's the only one outside of Australia and perhaps the only chance most European enthusiast are likely to ever see.

So far from home make it almost unique and extra special.

Surely someone can make some space in a good shed and buy it some time. Already dismantled and relatively small, it must be one of the easiest relics to save

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16 years 7 months

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Viscount, it seems your idea ties in with mine. I always thought the Drover looked like a Dove taking a step backwards. Fixed gear, three engines instead of two. Mind you, looking at it I think there may be little if anything interchangeable between the two airframes. Maybe the wings and tailplane. The fuselage lacks the Dove's domed cockpit roof, though whether that would be difficult to change I don't know.

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7 years 11 months

Posts: 21

I am interested in your offer and have sent you a private email with my phone contact details.

REGARDS

This might not be the right forum to put this on but i have in dry storage the Drover aircraft that was removed by Barry Parkhouse from an outdoor museum that closed a couple of years ago. I have to get rid of it by the end of February and wondered if anyone would like it. It is free to anyone that would like to take it otherwise i will have to scrap it which is the last thing i want to do. As i mentioned it has been dry stored and it looks as though everything is there from the day it was dismantled. It is not for the faint hearted but it could be assembled again for static display. I can assist in loading and it can all fit on one artic lorry. It is at St Athan near Cardiff Airport. To many other projects means that it has to go.

Member for

20 years 1 month

Posts: 9,780

The Otter was last reported under restoration in Essex . Its ultimate destination as yet unknown but clear faith from BAS. Regards the Drover - its not massively significant in the U.K -but then again I can think of a number of museums that house aircraft of less significance!

In terms of the D.H museum -little need to have two Doves - one is enough opposite a Drover to show what the offshoots of the company achieved. Telling the story of the D.H enterprise can only be done if you tell it all -cherry pick it and you have a disjointed story with no real way to justify where the likes of the Chipmunk are in the story.

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11 years 8 months

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I see no reason why the UK should not be proud of colonial history.

The aircraft was locally built for local conditions and being able to use some components and a lot of know how from the Dove made it happen when otherwise it may not have been possible at that time.

It should not be a case where only the superior or pretty get saved. It is workhorses like the Drover that much of history is truly built upon and the Flying Doctor Drover is like a BOAC VC 10, TWA Constellation or RAF Spitfire in that is an iconic operator/airframe combination.

If this was not in the UK it is unlikely one would ever come here. Well. it is her and is a part of history albeit indirect but worthy to should how a very successful light twin, Dove, formed the basis for a very successful adaption in the colonies.

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16 years 7 months

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Mike, certainly not just my idea. For a more detailed description of the design thinking, have a look at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Australia_DHA-3_Drover

Also the DH Dove design connection is mentioned on several Australian sites if you Google 'DHA-3 Drover'.


Yes I was inquisitive enough to have looked at that without recommendation. Seems strange that the Dove was designed a year before the Drover. Someone commented the other day that after the DH 9 the company forgot how to build ugly aircraft and I agree, in its own way even the Drover looks right.
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20 years 1 month

Posts: 8,426

The Otter was last reported under restoration in Essex . Its ultimate destination as yet unknown but clear faith from BAS. Regards the Drover - its not massively significant in the U.K -but then again I can think of a number of museums that house aircraft of less significance!

In terms of the D.H museum -little need to have two Doves - one is enough opposite a Drover to show what the offshoots of the company achieved. Telling the story of the D.H enterprise can only be done if you tell it all -cherry pick it and you have a disjointed story with no real way to justify where the likes of the Chipmunk are in the story.

Quite so, but you don't need an example of every airframe to do so. Please don't try to shame any organisation into taking something on; it will only end in tears. I don't speak for them any more, but in my opinion, they have enough to do without taking on something else which would have to live outdoors. Like many museums, I see them more likely to rationalise than expand any time soon. When it was under my control, I made the serious mistake of taking on too much - something I don't have to deal with, but the current incumbents do.

Bruce