FHCAM JU-87R-4 Stuka revealed

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And isnt the FW189 ongoing still...? and the HE11 (Casa) ? TT
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Thanks for sharing Tony, I'd only seen Randy's earlier video which was a slideshow of some photos - he posted about 50 great detail and overall images on Facebook. Dave McDonald from Classic Wings magazine has confirmed with FHCAM and shared on a couple of other forums that the bulk of the project consists of R-4 WkNr.6234 - one of the former Sir Tim Wallis aircraft and that which was registered to Glenn Lacey as G-STUK - and minor parts from R-2 WkNr.5709.

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Just to add to add to the above post that it measures approx. 29 inches x 12 inches, also looking at the fuel pipe work I would think these would of possibly been added for extra wing fuel tanks.
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Nice find, hawker, especially with history. Rob

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Did these originate with the Jim Pearce recoveries?
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That Stuka looks mightily impressive. It just shows that, with enough money, you can have anything you want! Will it have a genuine Jumo 211 or will something like an Allison or Merlin or even a Griffon be used to power it? Anon.

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Jumo 211

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Hi DaveF68 Im not to sure where this had originated from but maybe the label may help as someone out there may possibly recognise it.
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DaveF68: DaveM2 may have more recent/accurate information, but Goodall says the R-4 WkNr.6234 is a 1992 Jim Pearce recovery while the R-2 WkNr.5709 was recovered in 1996 and went to "Royal Air Warbird Finders, England".

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What a monster it is. The Stuka has so much presence in the air or on the ground. I wonder how long it will be before it flies.
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The current word is a year-and-a-half to two years.
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Here's hoping that like the NZ Mosquitos, they chose to use the knowledge gained to bring a couple more back to life. The RAF museums was said to be in pretty good nick to the point they managed to start the engine, though sadly I doubt they would allow the work to be done.
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Many of the RAF Museums Axis aeroplanes were run regularly when they were at St Athen. It's a shame they weren't kept live at Cosford.
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There are a handful of videos on YouTube of types like the Me210(?) and two-seat Fw190 being run at St Athan, when I learned their Stuka was started I was very disappointed that no-one seems to have filmed it. Or, rather, allowed their film to be uploaded. Hearing a Jumo run is one aspect of an airworthy Stuka that I've been excited and curious about since childhood.
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This will be very fun to watch. What a treat it would be to fly it!
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How does someone go about getting a test pilot for this? Seeing as one hasn't flown for a bloody long time? is it Just a case of reading pilots notes and studying the type then going flying or is it more complex than that?
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What the flight Heritage and Combat Air Museum does, is call Steve Hinton for most of their first flights! I wouldn't think the Stuka is particularly hard to fly. An experienced warbird pilot would do as you suggest. Read the notes, study the cockpit and learn where everything is, do some engine runs then go fly.
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As mentioned before, the Stuka was a very stable aircraft with an excellent take off and landing behaviour. Of course, it wasn´t a fighter. So Steve Hinton will be a little bit bored when he will fly the JU 87 for the first time within the next three years. If you are interested in the flying characteristics of german aircraft of the 2nd. WW, just read the book, which was issued by Eric Brown. He flew most of the german aircraft during and after the war.It is very interesting, how he judged about the characteristics of these aircraft. Especially his words about the 262 were very surprising. Before I read his book, I thought the P51 was the best fighter aircraft of the 2nd. WW.

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This, the CR.42 on show and the new NZ Mosquito are certainly the best warbird news pieces of the year IMHO. As stated, if it is displayed with the Jericho Trumpet it shall be outstanding. I intend to drop in on the trip from the Antipodes to Legends next year to see progress on this rare machine and if it is made public, at the first flight. Wonderful news !!!