Help with an airfoil

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6 years 1 month

Posts: 169

I am seeking help on behalf of my son- working through a paper on aerodynamics there is reference to an airfoil wing section I.A. 608. So far we have been unable to find out precisely what this airfoil is. Does anyone have any ideas? The paper was originally in Polish if that helps. Thanks in anticipation.
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Member for

6 years 1 month

Posts: 169

Thanks for the efforts. At one level the context isn't important. It is an aerodynamics modelling project where a wonderful reference from the late 70's turned up. In order to understand it the airfoil under discussion needed to be identified, and the I.A. reference appears no-where else on the Interweb or in any of the airfoil databases I found (including that one). NACA would be easy. While technically it is only semi-Historic Aircraft, the great and good on here seemed most likely to be able to help. I now wonder if it is one of the pre-War series from the Goetingen Institute (of Aviation? Airfoils?).
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10 years 8 months

Posts: 2,595

Thanks for the efforts. At one level the context isn't important. It is an aerodynamics modelling project where a wonderful reference from the late 70's turned up. In order to understand it the airfoil under discussion needed to be identified, and the I.A. reference appears no-where else on the Interweb or in any of the airfoil databases I found (including that one). NACA would be easy. While technically it is only semi-Historic Aircraft, the great and good on here seemed most likely to be able to help. I now wonder if it is one of the pre-War series from the Goetingen Institute (of Aviation? Airfoils?).
Gottingen does have a peculiar 608 foil. https://www3.nd.edu/~ame40462/RiegelsAerofoilSections.pdf

Member for

6 years 1 month

Posts: 169

That page (and another commenting on 3 digit foil codes) is the reason that I think it might be the way to go. I have offered the info and lets see how the simulations run. As foils go it is a bit basic, being the circumference and a chord from a circle, but if you don't play with the options you never get anywhere. Now why that particular foil was chosen to explore what happens with a canard is a whole different question.