Rare find.. or maybe not?

Profile picture for user ZRX61

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14 years 5 months

Posts: 4,789

Someone working at Tinker AFB spotted this today. Earliest test date was '44. Gonna start paying closer attention to gas bottles... https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/55563324_10216347232786206_2308065547415191552_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_ht=scontent-lax3-1.xx&oh=0bb5dc536422e26c079c7b15b5827cfd&oe=5D4FBB4F
Original post
Profile picture for user J Boyle

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15 years

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A few years ago I was taking my vintage roadster to a club meet at the Indianapolis race track and I find that my enclosed trailer has a puncture. The tire still has about half its air, so I drive about half a block to a gas station, they top it off (enough to go a block to a tire shop) with a WWII aircraft yellow oxygen bottle. I thought that was rather neat. I wouldn't mind getting one to use as an emergency air source for when I'm away from home.

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13 years 10 months

Posts: 1,171

Back in the 1980's I worked for a organisation that was contracted to maintain some foreign registered executive BAe 1-11 srs400, they had all been around a bit so when we started doing the heavy maintenance we found a few odd repairs, illegal mods, lax maintenance and wrong parts installed. Among the components removed were the Oxygen bottles and these were sent to a workshop for hydrostatic testing and inspection where they looked for internal corrosion, occasionally a bottle would be scrapped for that reason but ultimately they all had a scrap life of 25 years so any getting close to 25 years were also scrapped, one of the three removed from one of these 1-11's was date stamped 1944, I would have loved to know where it had been during its life and what aircraft types it had been fitted to. Richard
Profile picture for user ZRX61

Member for

14 years 5 months

Posts: 4,789

A few years ago I was taking my vintage roadster to a club meet at the Indianapolis race track and I find that my enclosed trailer has a puncture. The tire still has about half its air, so I drive about half a block to a gas station, they top it off (enough to go a block to a tire shop) with a WWII aircraft yellow oxygen bottle. I thought that was rather neat. I wouldn't mind getting one to use as an emergency air source for when I'm away from home.
Saw a large aircraft one for sale a while back for $20.00. same size as used in a B17 etc, but painted Marine Blue like a Tigercat. Should have bought it... :( New automotive ones are known as air pigs. Usually about 5 or 6gal size. People often paint a curly tail on one end & a snout on the other. As for regular gas bottles like the one I posted, in the original thread on FB quite a few people said they'd seen really old ones still in use, including a 1911 & 1914.
Profile picture for user dhfan

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19 years 10 months

Posts: 2,655

My other half worked for a manufacturer of high-pressure gas cylinders for many years. I asked one of her colleagues how old was the oldest re-certified and he said pre WW1, 1908 I think but it was years ago. Bear in mind this isn't just in use but returned to the manufacturer, blasted, tested, repainted and stamped and certified for another X years service as good as new.
Profile picture for user ZRX61

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14 years 5 months

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They get tested/stamped every 10 years here.
Profile picture for user dhfan

Member for

19 years 10 months

Posts: 2,655

It depends on the gas here but never longer than 10 years. I didn't know - I asked since my last post.