Sea Harriers On UK Register

Member for

14 years 1 month

Posts: 2,810

A single and twin seat Sea Harrier have been registered on the G reg. A source on UKAR says the owners are the same as the North Weald Gnats. Now dont shoot the messenger with all the comments about them never flying here in the UK. Consider that the deciding factors enabling UK flight are with the CAA. Several surprising projects are in progress and I believe that more are to come if the engineering support is available.

Original post
Profile picture for user R4118

Member for

4 years 4 months

Posts: 427

I was told the other day there was 2 harriers on the register both to be based out of st athan.

Profile picture for user R4118

Member for

4 years 4 months

Posts: 427

That's the two! Was told they could be on the display circuit next year!

Profile picture for user Firebird

Member for

16 years 8 months

Posts: 2,108

The Sea Harrier F/A2 is ex-ZH803, and the T.8 is ex-ZD990.

I'll still be gobsmacked if they ever fly in the UK though in this post-Shoreham era, despite Art Nalls proving it can be done in the USA for a good number of years.

Member for

14 years 1 month

Posts: 2,810

Try some logic...jets fly and display in the UK and recently Harriers at Yeovilton and Fairford. They operate and display according to pre checked regulations . The locations are approved and defined areas assigned for the display. Some jets are flown by civvy pilots on MOD contracts, eg Hawks,Hunters ,Dassault Falcons. Why therefore can you isolate one type which is currently in service ?

scotavia - These Harriers at Yeovilton, are they flying on military or civilian registration?

Have a read of CAP 632 and CAP 1640 available for free from the CAA website.

Member for

2 years 9 months

Posts: 588

Spanish Navy Harriers (Matadors?) at Yeovilton Air Show...

Member for

14 years 1 month

Posts: 2,810

I am going to make a simple suggestion, yes so simple that it should already be a forum sticky.....If the owners of the aircraft register an aircraft with the UK CAA with intent to fly then they will have already established that the route to flying is already open provided that they follow the agreed process. When I made the first post I said " Now dont shoot the messenger with all the comments about them never flying here in the UK. Consider that the deciding factors enabling UK flight are with the CAA." I suggest that making comments here amounts to speculation and of course that does not happen on this forum.

In aviation, their are those who are willing to spend their money on a nonstarter idea because their are others telling them it can be done. Those doing the telling are the ones who will make money from such schemes. If it’s too good to be true ...

I could save the investors a whole heap of £££,£££ it they would like to listen to the unpalatable reality if they want to pay be just £,£££.

Member for

5 years 8 months

Posts: 44

I can tell you all that this project has not been an overnight decision. It has been years. If you look at all media sites there are numerous comments about wanting to see Harriers fly in the UK so instead of the negative comments from armchair experts maybe we should be wishing all the best and hope to see a Harrier that is owned and operated in the UK flying soon.
All the armchair experts said that the Vulcan would not fly.

Profile picture for user Firebird

Member for

16 years 8 months

Posts: 2,108

I am going to make a simple suggestion, yes so simple that it should already be a forum sticky.....If the owners of the aircraft register an aircraft with the UK CAA with intent to fly then they will have already established that the route to flying is already open provided that they follow the agreed process.

If you bother to check back through the annuls of G-reg history you'll find plenty of 'complex' types that were registered with a G-**** by their UK owners, but never got air under their wings in UK skies, for example Lightnings G-LTNG, G-PIOB, G-BPFE.
And that agreed process involves OEM/DA support.

Member for

5 years 8 months

Posts: 44

You do not need OEM/DA approval with a Part 21 Approval

You do not need OEM/DA approval with a Part 21 Approval

Priceless.

Member for

8 years 7 months

Posts: 59

You do not need OEM/DA approval with a Part 21 Approval

Priceless indeed!

A Part 21 subpart G Manufacturing Organisation must have an arrangement with a Design Organisation, EU Regulation 748/2012, 21.A.133(b) and (c) refers.

Plus the Harrier is a "Non EASA" aircraft

Member for

6 years 2 months

Posts: 194

Sorry, what does all this mean to a layman? I'm lost

Andrew, I could explain that but I just an ‘armchair expert’.

Member for

8 years 7 months

Posts: 59

Ex Brat...
Me too!

Perhaps we should drag our armchairs together!

XL189, there are those who will always confuse fantasy and reality. The means by which ex military aircraft can be awarded a CAA Permit to Fly is well established and freely available to read online. For the Harrier there is already the CAA opinion that the type is considered to be in the ‘complex’ category.

Perhaps user Nad would like to explain how and why the CAA will allow a civilian register Harrier, unsupported by an OEM/DA, to fly in the UK?

Firebird, no escape for you; pull up a chair. Popcorn anyone?

Profile picture for user WP840

Member for

13 years 9 months

Posts: 1,955

I have read elsewhere that the aircraft will only be displaying using standard flying and not hovering or other manoeuvres involving rotation of it's nozzles.

Profile picture for user Bruce

Member for

19 years 11 months

Posts: 8,424

Some years ago, I was vociferous in my commenting that another aircraft would never gain permission to fly from the CAA - and I was wrong. I refer of course to the Vulcan. So I take the view of never say never. The Harrier, although defined as complex, isn't especially so; with the exception of the engine controls.

This said, I did contact Rolls Royce on behalf of a customer about 15 years ago, to see if it might be possible. My request went all the way to the board, and was turned down flat. At the time, that was that - but things change, and ways can be found. It is also true that one can register anything in the UK with great ease. It could be said to be a statement of intent rather than anything else.

Bruce