help identifying gauges

Profile picture for user Fouga23

Member for

14 years

Posts: 2,243

Could anyone here tell me which aircraft these instruments are from? Any help is appreciated.
http://www.fougamagister.be/gauges1.jpg
http://www.fougamagister.be/gauges2.jpg
http://www.fougamagister.be/gauges3.jpg
thanks!

Original post
Profile picture for user mark_pilkington

Member for

15 years 7 months

Posts: 1,735

Fouga

it would be easier to seek help if in addition to the photos you could present the details of each instrument in the following text form to help identify possible aircraft types as they appear to be of various vintage and nationality ie French? UK, USA?

you should be able to identify for each one the maker, ie Bendix etc

If they are UK Mininstry of Defence they will have a name plate or ink stamp with 6A/1234 or 106A/1234 format identity numbers, US Defence will have their own numbers ,purely civiluse instruments may not have any such ID but the maker may still provide a model number of some description,

you then need to identify them by function/role ie you have various carb, exhaust and oil temp gauges, % RPM, flap indicators etc

you will also need to list their indication/display range ie for the instrument pictured bottom row left side it is a dual scale 0-120 degree C Oil Temperature gauge, knowing its nationality, make, model and if avail "6A/" identity number would allow type of aircraft to be identified with someone familiar with either that nationality, or that make.

However I am reasonably sure the middle row second from left instrument USA made Milwaukee Wisconcin ?eaver ?Rooks Co "0 - 500" Degree Farienheit Tempurature gauge is NOT from any aircraft as it shows a "streilizer range marking from 240 to 250 Deg F which suggests its for some industrial process like milk processing?

Many others look post war, and appear to be marked in French?

best I can do from the photos provided, but I am sure the above text details will allow others to assist.

If the pointers and scale markings glow in the dark after exposure to strong lights or daylight they are most likely radioactive coated.

regards

Mark Pilkington

Member for

14 years 2 months

Posts: 472

Fouga

If the pointers and scale markings glow in the dark after exposure to strong lights or daylight they are most likely radioactive coated.

Ah no - the safe, non radioactive, phosphorescent coating are really quite efficient so they will give a very good glow in the dark......... Hence its impossible to use a glow in the dark test to confirm if radioactive. (In fact its pretty much the opposite of what you describe, safe phosphorescent are light energised, whilst radio-luminescent are not) Just looking very closely at the paint is not at all reliably even if you've seen a good few (cream with tiny brown specks if you want to give it a try....... but its very difficult).

Some, a few, are marked with an "L" next to or near the part number.

The only sure way you will tell is by ref to the spec or a Geiger counter.

In the UK late in the 1940's most radioactive faces were changed out, and its only a minority (maybe 1 in 15-20) that are radioactive when I check with my Geiger counter.

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11 years 3 months

Posts: 824

row 2 numbers 1&5 and row 3 numbers 1,2 & 4 look suspicious ;)

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Member for

14 years

Posts: 2,243

Bump :) Anyone know what aircraft these came from?