Help with camera settings please.

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Member for

20 years 1 month

Posts: 1,496

Shoot in RAW format and use Nikons ViewNX software that came with the camera to process. You will be pleasantly surprised at the results.
This was shot using the 70-300 lens, taken in RAW format (.NEF is Nikons version of RAW) processed with ViewNX and converted to .jpg

[ATTACH=CONFIG]228574[/ATTACH]

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Member for

14 years 1 month

Posts: 4,996

That's a lovely picture Denis, considering that it must have been taken using a relatively slow speed ?
I've not tried RAW yet, although I have seen it demonstrated using Photoshop, by Nik Szymanek at our Astronomy club.
He is an absolute wizard at processing astronomical images.

He recommended (I seem to remember), saving the images at Tiffs at each stage of the process. ?
I shall have a go.

What do you and others think about the use of filters ?
Going back to my 35mm days, it was the norm to use a UV filter to protect the lens if nothing else.
On my SX40 I also made a lot of use of a polarizing filter, as I took a lot of pictures in museums of items in glass cases.
Will either enhance cloud patterns in the sky to any extent ? According to the blurb they will, but in practice ?

Member for

20 years 7 months

Posts: 7,027

Personally i use a skylight filter to protect my lenses BUT there is a chain of thought that lenses don't really need that much protection.I did see a web page where this guy debunks the myth of needing a lens filter as he progressed to tape over the front of a lens then chip bits off but it didn't register the damage on the photo.I wish i could find it now.

Member for

14 years 1 month

Posts: 4,996

Personally i use a skylight filter to protect my lenses BUT there is a chain of thought that lenses don't really need that much protection.I did see a web page where this guy debunks the myth of needing a lens filter as he progressed to tape over the front of a lens then chip bits off but it didn't register the damage on the photo.I wish i could find it now.

Not something I think I would try.

Although as I mentioned previously, a polarizing filter is handy for taking pictures into water or through glass
I shall have to experiment with sky and cloud shots.

Thanks for the link Charlie.

Member for

11 years 7 months

Posts: 702

I would generally put a skylight filter on to protect the lens. A lens may be unaffected by damage but the price when you come to sell it definitely will be. A filter helps keeps the front element clean and in the event of an accident, I'd rather replace a £20 filter than a £500 lens.

I haven't used a polarizing filter for years - not since I shot monochrome film

Member for

20 years 1 month

Posts: 1,496

it must have been taken using a relatively slow speed ?

I have just looked at the basic exif info in the RAW files for that image.

Shot at f16 with a shutter speed of 1/250th sec and ISO set at 200. focus mode was AF-C, AF area mode- Dynamic,focal length 300mm (which on my cropped sensor works out to about 445mm)

Member for

14 years 1 month

Posts: 4,996

Thanks, these camera settings are slowly coming back to me. :)

I was just going by the prop blur as regards shutter speed.

"...(which on my cropped sensor works out to about 445mm) ..." explain please.

As an experiment, I took a picture of a cloud earlier to see what difference a polarizing filter made.
It was taken at around 6:15pm, so the light wasn't great. It doesn't prove anything other than to
show the filter can darken the sky. It might give more impressive and dramatic results on a landscape,
picture with sunshine in the foreground.

Both taken on Auto setting

Without filter
http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr141/Deetektor/Aviation%20pics%20with%20Nikon/with_zpsd0b62dd5.jpg

With filter, rotated for maximum effect.
http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr141/Deetektor/Aviation%20pics%20with%20Nikon/without_zps5bd8ba21.jpg

Member for

10 years 4 months

Posts: 375

for aircraft with props the higher the shutter speed the less blur to you want to be as low as possible, I tend to use a 1/250th shutter with between f4 and f10 if possible and as lower iso as possible max I use is 400 for aircraft

Member for

14 years 1 month

Posts: 4,996

The one annoying thing I find with the D3300, and I guess applies to all DSLRs ?
When taking videos, because the mirror has flipped, you can't see through the viewfinder. Unless you have a camera
with an electronic viewfinder, as with bridge cameras.

It's not easy to smoothly track a moving object in bright sunlight, using the back screen. I was thinking of making up a crude viewfinder which would clip into the flash hot shoe. The only problem then would be, zooming in and out. I shall experiment.

I cant justify buying a camcorder.