ARTHUR W. J. G. ORD-HUME

Groundcrew tend to the sole completed Heston T1/37, L7706, at Heston aerodrome. It was a surprisingly bulky machine for an ab initio trainer, with a 42ft wingspan. ALL PHOTOS AEROPLANE Feature Premium

The wartime trainer nobody wanted

Not only did Heston’s T1/37 trainer look faintly outsized for its role, but the requirement to which it was built seems to have been taken less than seriously by the Air Ministry

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Designing the Foster Wikner Wicko

Having arrived in Britain from Australia, Geoffrey Neville Wikner became one of the many aircraft designers fighting for a slice of the inter-war light aeroplane market. But, even if it wasn’t destined for great commercial success, his high-winged Wicko was certainly something different

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SLEEPING SATELLITE

An attractive, advanced design fit for the forward-looking post-war era, a manufacturer boasting plenty of experience in aviation and business — surely the Planet Satellite would succeed? Sadly, it failed on the most fundamental of levels

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FESTIVAL OF BRITAIN

 Looking back 70 years to the original ‘South Bank Show’,...

de Havilland 100: Making of the Moth

First flown five years into the life of Geoffrey de Havilland’s eponymous
company...

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ROUGH and Ready

Evaluating the Australian triple-engined airliner that never...