IN AT THE DEEP END

SQN LDR ‘ARCHIE’ KINCH RECALLS HOW ONE PILOT LEARNED THE HARD WAY DURING TRAINING TO FLY JETS IN THE 1950S

Sgt Archie Kinch.
ALL VIA AUTHOR UNLESS NOTED
A formation of CFS-based Harvard T.2Bs, circa 1951.
KEY COLLECTION

It was a sunny day in November 1952 and I was sitting on a bench outside the railway station at Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire, awaiting the arrival of a vehicle to take me to nearby Little Rissington.

Recently returned from the Far East, my posting instruction was to attend 147 Course at the Central Flying School (CFS) with the aim of becoming a service qualified flying instructor.

The roar of the North American Harvards and the screech of the Gloster Meteors overhead aroused in me a level of excitement I had not experienced since my last sortie in a Short Sunderland flying-boat of 205 Squadron.

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