STATE of the NATION

FUTURE OF THE PAST

Hundreds of thousands of people enjoy the UK’s aviation museums every year. They constitute a vital part of our national heritage. But what are they doing to attract new audiences, to keep themselves relevant in the modern era, and thus safeguard the history and the artefacts they display — and what are some of the underlying issues they face? In the final part of our ‘Future of the Past’ investigation, we find out from several of the sector’s leading lights how they are approaching these challenges and opportunities

Night-time photoshoots are among the special events museums can offer to help build new audiences, and add to their visitor experience. The Yorkshire Air Museum’s Halifax, Friday the 13th, makes an especially evocative sight after dark.

I do think aviation museums often are at a huge advantage, because the collections we have are intrinsically compelling. We can give people the opportunity to go aboard, or to sit in cockpits and things like that. Those are experiences that are so memorable to people…”

Want to read more?

This is a premium article and requires an active Key.Aero or Key Publishing subscription.

Existing subscriber? Sign in now

No subscription?

Pick one of our introductory offers

3 months

Standard subscription rate £29.99 + VAT

Launch rate £15.99 + VAT

Subscribe now
Reccomended

12 months

Standard subscription rate £69.99 + VAT

Launch rate £29.99 + VAT

Subscribe now

9 months

Standard subscription rate £39.99 + VAT

Launch rate £19.99 + VAT

Subscribe now